Rasmussen poll today shows Trump in the lead

To tell the truth, nobody knows who will turn out, and who will stay home. Early voting is capable of throwing a curveball, too. So I regard all polling with suspicion. But that said, Trump’s strong debate performance and the normal rhythm of campaigns and scandalous revelations suggests that after a big hit, the hot mic scandal should see a Trump rebound.  Rasmussen finds s big one:

The full results from Sunday night’s debate are in, and Donald Trump has come from behind to take the lead over Hillary Clinton.

The latest Rasmussen Reports White House Watch national telephone and online survey shows Trump with 43% support among Likely U.S. Voters to Clinton’s 41%. Yesterday, Clinton still held a four-point 43% to 39% lead over Trump, but  that was down from five points on Tuesday and her biggest lead ever of seven points on Monday.

According to Rasmussen, there actually still are millions of undecideds and flexibly committeds.

Eighty-four percent (84%) now say they are certain how they will vote in this year’s presidential election, and among these voters, Trump posts a 49% to 46% lead over Clinton. Among voters who say they still could change their minds between now and Election Day, it’s Clinton 40%, Trump 37%, Johnson 19% and Stein four percent (4%).

Wow, 40% of Hillary’s voters could change their minds. And Wikileaks keeps leaking.

As Yogi Berra taught us, “It ain’t over till it’s over.”

To tell the truth, nobody knows who will turn out, and who will stay home. Early voting is capable of throwing a curveball, too. So I regard all polling with suspicion. But that said, Trump’s strong debate performance and the normal rhythm of campaigns and scandalous revelations suggests that after a big hit, the hot mic scandal should see a Trump rebound.  Rasmussen finds s big one:

The full results from Sunday night’s debate are in, and Donald Trump has come from behind to take the lead over Hillary Clinton.

The latest Rasmussen Reports White House Watch national telephone and online survey shows Trump with 43% support among Likely U.S. Voters to Clinton’s 41%. Yesterday, Clinton still held a four-point 43% to 39% lead over Trump, but  that was down from five points on Tuesday and her biggest lead ever of seven points on Monday.

According to Rasmussen, there actually still are millions of undecideds and flexibly committeds.

Eighty-four percent (84%) now say they are certain how they will vote in this year’s presidential election, and among these voters, Trump posts a 49% to 46% lead over Clinton. Among voters who say they still could change their minds between now and Election Day, it’s Clinton 40%, Trump 37%, Johnson 19% and Stein four percent (4%).

Wow, 40% of Hillary’s voters could change their minds. And Wikileaks keeps leaking.

As Yogi Berra taught us, “It ain’t over till it’s over.”