DHS report: Mexican government helping thousands of Haitians enter the US illegally

Documents obtained by Rep. Duncan Hunter detail the assistance of the Mexican government in getting Haitian refugees into the US illegally.

In the last year, more than 6,000 Haitians have arrived at the border near San Diego with thousands more in Mexico waiting to get in. 

Washington Times:

“Haitians have forged a dangerous and clandestine new path to get to the United States,” says the document, which lays out in detail the route and the prices paid along the way for smugglers, bus tickets and, where they can be obtained legally, transit documents.

Their trek begins in Brazil and traces a 7,100-mile route up the west coast of South America and Central America, crossing 11 countries and taking as long as four months.

Some countries are more welcoming than others, according to the document, which was reviewed by The Washington Times. Nicaragua is listed as being particularly vigilant about deporting the Haitian migrants if they are caught, so smugglers there charge $1,000.

While traveling through Central American countries, the Haitians will claim to be from Congo. They believe authorities in Central America aren’t likely to go through the hassle of deporting them to West Africa if they are caught, the Homeland Security Department said.

Smugglers charge $200 through Ecuador and $300 each through Guatemala and Colombia, the document says.

Mexico, though, is more accommodating to the migrants. It stops them at its southern border in Tapachula, processes them and — though they don’t have legal entry papers — “they receive a 20-day transit document” giving them enough time to get a bus across Mexico, arriving eventually in Tijuana, just south of San Diego.

Once in the United States, many of the Haitians claim asylum and fight deportation in cases that can drag on for years, guaranteeing the migrants a foothold in the country. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said it received referrals to conduct credible fear screenings, the first part of an affirmative asylum claim, for 523 Haitians over the past year.

Other Haitians who are apprehended are put on a slow deportation track, giving them a chance to hide in the shadows along with other illegal immigrants. Southern Florida is a particularly attractive destination for Haitians, the document said.

Haitians are the latest nationality to surge into the United States, along with Central Americans enticed by the belief that lax enforcement policies under President Obama will enable them to stay, even if it means living in the shadows.

Mexico facilitates the transit of illegal aliens heading for the US so they don't have to take care of them. As long as they quickly exit Mexico, they will be assisted by the government.

This is hardly the actions of a friendly government who apparently can't be bothered deporting these illegals themelves. It's cheaper and easier just to send them on their way into the US where they can game the system so that they can stay indefinitely.

Between the influx of illegal aliens and legal refugees, hundreds of thousands of poor, illiterate, peasants with no skills to market in a modern economy are being placed in communities all across America. These communities are expected to house, clothe, feed, and educate the newcomers with little or no help from Washington. The strain placed on local communities means that citizens and others who are here legally get shorted on benefits their tax dollars support.

Not a satisfactory state of affairs. 

 

 

Documents obtained by Rep. Duncan Hunter detail the assistance of the Mexican government in getting Haitian refugees into the US illegally.

In the last year, more than 6,000 Haitians have arrived at the border near San Diego with thousands more in Mexico waiting to get in. 

Washington Times:

“Haitians have forged a dangerous and clandestine new path to get to the United States,” says the document, which lays out in detail the route and the prices paid along the way for smugglers, bus tickets and, where they can be obtained legally, transit documents.

Their trek begins in Brazil and traces a 7,100-mile route up the west coast of South America and Central America, crossing 11 countries and taking as long as four months.

Some countries are more welcoming than others, according to the document, which was reviewed by The Washington Times. Nicaragua is listed as being particularly vigilant about deporting the Haitian migrants if they are caught, so smugglers there charge $1,000.

While traveling through Central American countries, the Haitians will claim to be from Congo. They believe authorities in Central America aren’t likely to go through the hassle of deporting them to West Africa if they are caught, the Homeland Security Department said.

Smugglers charge $200 through Ecuador and $300 each through Guatemala and Colombia, the document says.

Mexico, though, is more accommodating to the migrants. It stops them at its southern border in Tapachula, processes them and — though they don’t have legal entry papers — “they receive a 20-day transit document” giving them enough time to get a bus across Mexico, arriving eventually in Tijuana, just south of San Diego.

Once in the United States, many of the Haitians claim asylum and fight deportation in cases that can drag on for years, guaranteeing the migrants a foothold in the country. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said it received referrals to conduct credible fear screenings, the first part of an affirmative asylum claim, for 523 Haitians over the past year.

Other Haitians who are apprehended are put on a slow deportation track, giving them a chance to hide in the shadows along with other illegal immigrants. Southern Florida is a particularly attractive destination for Haitians, the document said.

Haitians are the latest nationality to surge into the United States, along with Central Americans enticed by the belief that lax enforcement policies under President Obama will enable them to stay, even if it means living in the shadows.

Mexico facilitates the transit of illegal aliens heading for the US so they don't have to take care of them. As long as they quickly exit Mexico, they will be assisted by the government.

This is hardly the actions of a friendly government who apparently can't be bothered deporting these illegals themelves. It's cheaper and easier just to send them on their way into the US where they can game the system so that they can stay indefinitely.

Between the influx of illegal aliens and legal refugees, hundreds of thousands of poor, illiterate, peasants with no skills to market in a modern economy are being placed in communities all across America. These communities are expected to house, clothe, feed, and educate the newcomers with little or no help from Washington. The strain placed on local communities means that citizens and others who are here legally get shorted on benefits their tax dollars support.

Not a satisfactory state of affairs.