Clinton ad featuring nuclear launch officer reminiscent of LBJ's 'Daisy' ad

In politics, what's old is new.  Both candidates in this race aren't breaking any new ground when it comes to tactics or themes.  Even their digital efforts are based on tried and true campaign verities that date back to the end of World War II.

That's why it isn't surprising that Hillary Clinton's campaign would look to scare the heck out of voters by running an ad that questions Donald Trump's "judgment" when it comes to nuclear weapons.

CNN:

Hillary Clinton's campaign is warning Americans of a future in which Donald Trump is in control of the US's nuclear arsenal in a new ad featuring a former nuclear missile launch officer.

The 30-second ad, which is running on national cable TV and in six battleground states, according to a Clinton official, marks the campaign's most direct warning yet to voters that Trump is too erratic to be commander-in-chief and could endanger the country and the world's safety and security as president. It includes an image of a missile inside a silo as an alarm sounds in the background.

The ad, entitled "Silo," splices the first person testimonial of a former nuclear missile launch officer with comments Trump has made, including saying he wants to "bomb the s--- out of" ISIS, wanting to be "unpredictable" and declaring: "I love war."

It was put together before The Washington Post published a bombshell story on stunningly demeaning comments Trump made about women in 2005.

In the ad, former Air Force officer Bruce Blair, who is now an arms control scholar at Princeton University, reflects on his time as a launch officer controlling intercontinental ballistic missiles.

"If the president gave the order we had to launch the missiles. That would be it. I prayed that call would never come," Blair says in the ad. "Self control may be all that keeps these missiles from firing."

CNN makes the connection to the most famous political ad in history: LBJ's horrifying "Daisy" ad:

The TV spot evoked the infamous "Daisy" ad President Lyndon Johnson ran against 1964 Republican nominee Barry Goldwater, which featured a little girl counting down petals on a daisy before a man's voice counts down to a nuclear explosion, featuring a mushroom cloud.

The ad is also similar to the Clinton campaign's "Just One" ad the Clinton campaign aired in August which also warned that Trump was not stable enough to be president and included similar clips of Trump to those used in the latest ad.

Priorities USA, a pro-Clinton super PAC, also ran an ad last month that included Trump's past comments about being willing to use nuclear weapons that finished on the message: "Donald Trump. Dangerous. Unfit to be President."

The "Daisy" ad ran once and only on NBC.  The Republicans went ballistic, and no other network would air it.

But ironically, the controversy surrounding the ad guaranteed that it would be played over and over again on news shows.  At the time, it was considered a low blow, but it became the most famous political ad of all time for one reason: it worked.

Today, voters really don't care that Trump is unstable.  That's why the impact of the nuclear launch officer ad has been minimal.  The airwaves are so saturated with ads that people have already stopped paying attention.

They don't believe what's in the ads anyway.

In politics, what's old is new.  Both candidates in this race aren't breaking any new ground when it comes to tactics or themes.  Even their digital efforts are based on tried and true campaign verities that date back to the end of World War II.

That's why it isn't surprising that Hillary Clinton's campaign would look to scare the heck out of voters by running an ad that questions Donald Trump's "judgment" when it comes to nuclear weapons.

CNN:

Hillary Clinton's campaign is warning Americans of a future in which Donald Trump is in control of the US's nuclear arsenal in a new ad featuring a former nuclear missile launch officer.

The 30-second ad, which is running on national cable TV and in six battleground states, according to a Clinton official, marks the campaign's most direct warning yet to voters that Trump is too erratic to be commander-in-chief and could endanger the country and the world's safety and security as president. It includes an image of a missile inside a silo as an alarm sounds in the background.

The ad, entitled "Silo," splices the first person testimonial of a former nuclear missile launch officer with comments Trump has made, including saying he wants to "bomb the s--- out of" ISIS, wanting to be "unpredictable" and declaring: "I love war."

It was put together before The Washington Post published a bombshell story on stunningly demeaning comments Trump made about women in 2005.

In the ad, former Air Force officer Bruce Blair, who is now an arms control scholar at Princeton University, reflects on his time as a launch officer controlling intercontinental ballistic missiles.

"If the president gave the order we had to launch the missiles. That would be it. I prayed that call would never come," Blair says in the ad. "Self control may be all that keeps these missiles from firing."

CNN makes the connection to the most famous political ad in history: LBJ's horrifying "Daisy" ad:

The TV spot evoked the infamous "Daisy" ad President Lyndon Johnson ran against 1964 Republican nominee Barry Goldwater, which featured a little girl counting down petals on a daisy before a man's voice counts down to a nuclear explosion, featuring a mushroom cloud.

The ad is also similar to the Clinton campaign's "Just One" ad the Clinton campaign aired in August which also warned that Trump was not stable enough to be president and included similar clips of Trump to those used in the latest ad.

Priorities USA, a pro-Clinton super PAC, also ran an ad last month that included Trump's past comments about being willing to use nuclear weapons that finished on the message: "Donald Trump. Dangerous. Unfit to be President."

The "Daisy" ad ran once and only on NBC.  The Republicans went ballistic, and no other network would air it.

But ironically, the controversy surrounding the ad guaranteed that it would be played over and over again on news shows.  At the time, it was considered a low blow, but it became the most famous political ad of all time for one reason: it worked.

Today, voters really don't care that Trump is unstable.  That's why the impact of the nuclear launch officer ad has been minimal.  The airwaves are so saturated with ads that people have already stopped paying attention.

They don't believe what's in the ads anyway.