Blacks boycotting Hillary’s campaign events

Oh, it’s no organized boycott, mind you, just a grassroots response to the frosty, rich white lady who travels around like some empress.  The irrepressible Sundance of Conservative Treehouse points out the media’s complicity of silence in reporting on the empty seats greeting Hillary Clinton at black-oriented events.

At a campaign event at Little Rock AME Zion Church, media reports did not show views of the audience.  But Sundance found this:

[I would also note that a campaign event at a church should jeopardize that church’s tax exemption.  But of course they will have a rationale, and the IRS is not interested in pursuing left-wing tax-exempt organizations.]

But this example takes the cake:

Last month, Hillary Clinton gave the key note address to the National Baptist Convention in Kansas City.  There were 20,000 convention attendees for the four day conference, yet less than 3,000 attended the key note address.

Now, think about these two examples.  One of the most famous people in the world, on the brink of the presidency, comes to your church or your convention.  And yet you don’t bother to show up.  You stay away.  I suspect that on a normal Sunday at Little Rock AME Zion, there are fewer empty seats in the pews.

There is some serious antipathy toward Hillary Clinton in the African-American community.  People don’t talk about it, because talk can be dangerous these days.  But people are voting with their feet.

Oh, it’s no organized boycott, mind you, just a grassroots response to the frosty, rich white lady who travels around like some empress.  The irrepressible Sundance of Conservative Treehouse points out the media’s complicity of silence in reporting on the empty seats greeting Hillary Clinton at black-oriented events.

At a campaign event at Little Rock AME Zion Church, media reports did not show views of the audience.  But Sundance found this:

[I would also note that a campaign event at a church should jeopardize that church’s tax exemption.  But of course they will have a rationale, and the IRS is not interested in pursuing left-wing tax-exempt organizations.]

But this example takes the cake:

Last month, Hillary Clinton gave the key note address to the National Baptist Convention in Kansas City.  There were 20,000 convention attendees for the four day conference, yet less than 3,000 attended the key note address.

Now, think about these two examples.  One of the most famous people in the world, on the brink of the presidency, comes to your church or your convention.  And yet you don’t bother to show up.  You stay away.  I suspect that on a normal Sunday at Little Rock AME Zion, there are fewer empty seats in the pews.

There is some serious antipathy toward Hillary Clinton in the African-American community.  People don’t talk about it, because talk can be dangerous these days.  But people are voting with their feet.