Rep. Chaffetz serves subpoena to FBI witness for all Clinton email documents during hearing

In a highly unusual move, Rep. Jason Chaffetz served a subpoena to an FBI official for all documents the bureau has gathered during the course of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's email server in the middle of a committee hearing.

The nearly unprecedented action reflects a growing frustration by the Oversight Committee with the FBI over what they see as a lack of cooperation in investigating the decision made by Director Comey in not indicting Clinton.

Daily Caller:

Will the FBI provide to Congress the full file with no redactions of personal identifiable information?” Chaffetz asked Jason Herring, the FBI’s acting assistant director of legislative affairs, during a House Oversight and Government Reform hearing.

“I cannot make that commitment sitting here today,” Herring said.

Chaffetz has sought all of the records related to the FBI’s Clinton email investigation, including all interview notes, which are referred to as 302s. Earlier this month, the FBI released a heavily-redacted report of its conclusions from the investigation.

The bureau also released Hillary Clinton’s 302 to the public. It gave Congress 302s from other witness interviews, but not all of them.

Chaffetz has taken issue with that withholding as well as the FBI’s decision to redact unclassified personally identifiable information in its report.

“I’m going to issue a subpoena, and I’m going to do it right now,” Chaffetz said to Herring after being told that he could not commit to handing over all of the documents.

“I’ve signed this subpoena. We want all the 302s, and we would like the full file.”

“You can accept service on behalf of the FBI?” Chaffetz asked, as an aide sitting behind him on the dais was seen leaving to server Herring.

“Certainly,” the federal official said.

“You are hereby served. We have a duty and a responsibility. You can cite no precedent. Nothing in the Constitution. No legal precedent. You know this is important to us. You now have your subpoena. We would all like to see this information,” said Chaffetz.

Herring said that the FBI had planned to release other 302s as part of the Freedom of Information Act process.

The FBI can't hide behind the selective exposure of various parts of its investigation.  Clearly, they are trying to protect Comey.  When the full story is told, it's entirely possible that Comey's decision not to recommend prosecution of Clinton will be seen as even more inexplicable than it is now.

As for what the documents will tell us about Clinton, there are sure to be some nuggets of information that make her out to be a liar or worse.  It may not be as important as it should be to the race, however.  People have come to expect the worst when it comes to Hillary Clinton, and a few more revelations probably won't affect the race for president.

In a highly unusual move, Rep. Jason Chaffetz served a subpoena to an FBI official for all documents the bureau has gathered during the course of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's email server in the middle of a committee hearing.

The nearly unprecedented action reflects a growing frustration by the Oversight Committee with the FBI over what they see as a lack of cooperation in investigating the decision made by Director Comey in not indicting Clinton.

Daily Caller:

Will the FBI provide to Congress the full file with no redactions of personal identifiable information?” Chaffetz asked Jason Herring, the FBI’s acting assistant director of legislative affairs, during a House Oversight and Government Reform hearing.

“I cannot make that commitment sitting here today,” Herring said.

Chaffetz has sought all of the records related to the FBI’s Clinton email investigation, including all interview notes, which are referred to as 302s. Earlier this month, the FBI released a heavily-redacted report of its conclusions from the investigation.

The bureau also released Hillary Clinton’s 302 to the public. It gave Congress 302s from other witness interviews, but not all of them.

Chaffetz has taken issue with that withholding as well as the FBI’s decision to redact unclassified personally identifiable information in its report.

“I’m going to issue a subpoena, and I’m going to do it right now,” Chaffetz said to Herring after being told that he could not commit to handing over all of the documents.

“I’ve signed this subpoena. We want all the 302s, and we would like the full file.”

“You can accept service on behalf of the FBI?” Chaffetz asked, as an aide sitting behind him on the dais was seen leaving to server Herring.

“Certainly,” the federal official said.

“You are hereby served. We have a duty and a responsibility. You can cite no precedent. Nothing in the Constitution. No legal precedent. You know this is important to us. You now have your subpoena. We would all like to see this information,” said Chaffetz.

Herring said that the FBI had planned to release other 302s as part of the Freedom of Information Act process.

The FBI can't hide behind the selective exposure of various parts of its investigation.  Clearly, they are trying to protect Comey.  When the full story is told, it's entirely possible that Comey's decision not to recommend prosecution of Clinton will be seen as even more inexplicable than it is now.

As for what the documents will tell us about Clinton, there are sure to be some nuggets of information that make her out to be a liar or worse.  It may not be as important as it should be to the race, however.  People have come to expect the worst when it comes to Hillary Clinton, and a few more revelations probably won't affect the race for president.