Jesse Jackson refuses to condemn Charlotte violence

The Rev. Jesse Jackson never met a race riot he didn't like and proved it again in an interview with Fox News' Neil Cavuto.

Jackson was asked repeatedly by Cavuto to condemn the violence in Charlotte outright and never answered. Instead, he appeared to give it his blessing by saying that "a riot is the language of the unheard."

Washington Free Beacon:

Jackson would not say at one point during the interview if the rioting was fair to the victims who were affected.

“Do you find that what happened last night got out of control when so many, when so many started attacking structures, attacking police vehicles, breaking into stores, many of them black owned businesses. Is that fair?” Cavuto asked.

It’s not fun,” Jackson said before referencing a quote from Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard.”

“But when the police literally, and the camera becomes the conduit of justice, shoots them with their hands up in the air, again, that’s wrong, and those who do it should face the full weight of quick justice,” Jackson said.

“But you seem to be saying that all 680 cases that we’ve seen in the past year and a half where blacks were shot by police were all that way,” Cavuto said. “Were there not some that were legitimate, where a gun was involved?”

“Shooting people in the back is not legitimate,” Jackson responded.

“Careful, careful. Because you always say don’t generalize,” Cavuto said.

Jackson later said that not many police officers are being shot, although the press widely covered the five Dallas police officers who were fatally shot in July.

The reverend then said the police in Charlotte are covering up Tuesday’s incident.

“Would you say you went one step too far there?” Cavuto asked.

Jackson did not answer the question and began quoting King again.

“So, you condone their losing and justify what they did?” Cavuto asked.

Jackson again did not answer and instead tried to propose a reverse scenario in which police officers were shooting white individuals.

“You are justifying what happened last night,” Cavuto said.

Jackson responded that he advocates for peaceful protests.

Jackson's response is little different from that given by Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. There is the pious insistence that he is for "peaceful protest" while giving a wink and a nod to the violence by trying to justify it as a response to racism.

Jackson's been doing this for 40 years and is well schooled in avoiding a pesky reporter's questions. But his attempt to straddle the issue of violence never works. You either wholeheartedly condemn the riots or you enable them - there's no middle ground, despite the fact that Jackson and other liberals would like you to think there is.

Things seem to be calming down in Charlotte, but you can bet the next outbreak of racial hatred will find the good revererend front and center in front of the TV cameras urging the rioters on.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson never met a race riot he didn't like and proved it again in an interview with Fox News' Neil Cavuto.

Jackson was asked repeatedly by Cavuto to condemn the violence in Charlotte outright and never answered. Instead, he appeared to give it his blessing by saying that "a riot is the language of the unheard."

Washington Free Beacon:

Jackson would not say at one point during the interview if the rioting was fair to the victims who were affected.

“Do you find that what happened last night got out of control when so many, when so many started attacking structures, attacking police vehicles, breaking into stores, many of them black owned businesses. Is that fair?” Cavuto asked.

It’s not fun,” Jackson said before referencing a quote from Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard.”

“But when the police literally, and the camera becomes the conduit of justice, shoots them with their hands up in the air, again, that’s wrong, and those who do it should face the full weight of quick justice,” Jackson said.

“But you seem to be saying that all 680 cases that we’ve seen in the past year and a half where blacks were shot by police were all that way,” Cavuto said. “Were there not some that were legitimate, where a gun was involved?”

“Shooting people in the back is not legitimate,” Jackson responded.

“Careful, careful. Because you always say don’t generalize,” Cavuto said.

Jackson later said that not many police officers are being shot, although the press widely covered the five Dallas police officers who were fatally shot in July.

The reverend then said the police in Charlotte are covering up Tuesday’s incident.

“Would you say you went one step too far there?” Cavuto asked.

Jackson did not answer the question and began quoting King again.

“So, you condone their losing and justify what they did?” Cavuto asked.

Jackson again did not answer and instead tried to propose a reverse scenario in which police officers were shooting white individuals.

“You are justifying what happened last night,” Cavuto said.

Jackson responded that he advocates for peaceful protests.

Jackson's response is little different from that given by Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. There is the pious insistence that he is for "peaceful protest" while giving a wink and a nod to the violence by trying to justify it as a response to racism.

Jackson's been doing this for 40 years and is well schooled in avoiding a pesky reporter's questions. But his attempt to straddle the issue of violence never works. You either wholeheartedly condemn the riots or you enable them - there's no middle ground, despite the fact that Jackson and other liberals would like you to think there is.

Things seem to be calming down in Charlotte, but you can bet the next outbreak of racial hatred will find the good revererend front and center in front of the TV cameras urging the rioters on.