In Tonight’s Debate: Don’t Read Her Lips, Watch Her Eyes

Dr. Ted Noel has an interesting new video, embedded below.

It discusses Hillary’s disconjugate gaze, when her eyes don’t move in sync.  Also referred to as loss of vergence, this is likely a neurological problem, Dr. Noel explains, rather than a problem with the eye muscle or the nerve controlling it.  It’s one symptom of Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Noel then discusses two devices that have provoked lots of speculation in the blogosphere:  Hillary’s earpiece and the small object carried by the Secret Service agent with medical training.

The earpiece is not likely being used for prompts from off-stage, but could be a CIC-V device to control the volume of the user’s speech, a problem in Parkinson’s.  It provides feedback to enable the user to speak more loudly when there is background noise and more quietly when this is appropriate.

What has been identified by some  as a diazepam injector (for seizures) and the left as a flashlight (by why is the agent carrying it in daylight?) is probably, says Dr. Noel, a laser pointer.  This can help unfreeze Parkinson’s sufferers who are stuck in place, unable to move their feet.

But Dr. Noel is not wedded to the Parkinson’s explanation.  There are other neurological disorders that could be responsible for the abnormal behavior that has been captured on video and in photos.  Noel mentions supranuclear palsy and post-concussion syndrome, and says there are about ten others.  All affect memory and cognitive ability, and the prognosis for none is good.

Dr. Ted Noel has an interesting new video, embedded below.

It discusses Hillary’s disconjugate gaze, when her eyes don’t move in sync.  Also referred to as loss of vergence, this is likely a neurological problem, Dr. Noel explains, rather than a problem with the eye muscle or the nerve controlling it.  It’s one symptom of Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Noel then discusses two devices that have provoked lots of speculation in the blogosphere:  Hillary’s earpiece and the small object carried by the Secret Service agent with medical training.

The earpiece is not likely being used for prompts from off-stage, but could be a CIC-V device to control the volume of the user’s speech, a problem in Parkinson’s.  It provides feedback to enable the user to speak more loudly when there is background noise and more quietly when this is appropriate.

What has been identified by some  as a diazepam injector (for seizures) and the left as a flashlight (by why is the agent carrying it in daylight?) is probably, says Dr. Noel, a laser pointer.  This can help unfreeze Parkinson’s sufferers who are stuck in place, unable to move their feet.

But Dr. Noel is not wedded to the Parkinson’s explanation.  There are other neurological disorders that could be responsible for the abnormal behavior that has been captured on video and in photos.  Noel mentions supranuclear palsy and post-concussion syndrome, and says there are about ten others.  All affect memory and cognitive ability, and the prognosis for none is good.