Soros group helped fund White House 'echo chamber' for Iran nuclear deal

A pro-Iranian left-wing group received $750,000 from the George Soros group Open Society to create a media "echo chamber" that would overwhelm critics of the Iran nuclear deal while doing the bidding of the White House to push the agreement.

The Ploughshares Fund, cited by the White House as one of the main architects of the P.R. campaign to push for passage of the Iran nuclear deal, requested the funds in order to hire experts and "validators" to orchestrate the messaging. 

Washington Free Beacon:

The March 2015 funding request was leaked online as part of a massive document disclosure that revealed Soros’s efforts to fund a large network of liberal nonprofits and political groups.

The disclosure of the Ploughshares request shines further light on backroom efforts by the White House and its top allies to create what they called an “echo chamber” to galvanize public support for the nuclear deal with Iran.

Ploughshares was cited by senior White House officials as a chief architect of this campaign, which flooded the media with various experts touting the deal.

Ploughshares requested the $750,000 in order to solidify its pro-Iran network and bring others into the fold, according to the funding request.

This included efforts to “broaden and better coordinate circle of experts and validators who support diplomacy, including prominent US, European and Israeli military and diplomatic personalities, as well as Iranian human rights and civil society leaders,” according to the document.

Ploughshares raised concerns that opponents of the deal would scuttle negotiations before the administration achieved a final agreement.

“One potential risk is that unforeseen events or actions by opponents in the US, Iran, Saudi Arabia or Israel somehow make a deal impossible before the grant is fully implemented,” the document states. “Another potential risk is that negotiations on an accord or implementation phases extend beyond timeframe of the grant, and opportunities to derail diplomacy persist after resources might have been expended.”

The money would be used to facilitate “mainstream and social media outreach by validators along with other public and private efforts to shape the debate in support of an agreement and continued diplomacy,” the request states.

Ploughshares also hoped to “increase outreach by coalition members and validators to policymakers with focus on long-term impact of the deal on regional and global security issues where potential cooperation with Iran could be beneficial.”

The request provides a glimpse into efforts by the White House and its allies to strengthen its grasp on the media in order to prevent negative coverage of the Iran agreement.

NPR reportedly took money from Ploughshares in order to put pro-agreement commentators on while canceling appearances by lawmakers opposed.  Needless to say, they didn't disclose this cozy arrangement.

Ploughshares helped sell the American people a bill of goods.  And one of the true ironies of this P.R. campaign is that deal boosters were railing against all the money deal opponents were spending to defeat the agreement.

With Soros backing the boosters, there was little chance they would be outspent. 

A pro-Iranian left-wing group received $750,000 from the George Soros group Open Society to create a media "echo chamber" that would overwhelm critics of the Iran nuclear deal while doing the bidding of the White House to push the agreement.

The Ploughshares Fund, cited by the White House as one of the main architects of the P.R. campaign to push for passage of the Iran nuclear deal, requested the funds in order to hire experts and "validators" to orchestrate the messaging. 

Washington Free Beacon:

The March 2015 funding request was leaked online as part of a massive document disclosure that revealed Soros’s efforts to fund a large network of liberal nonprofits and political groups.

The disclosure of the Ploughshares request shines further light on backroom efforts by the White House and its top allies to create what they called an “echo chamber” to galvanize public support for the nuclear deal with Iran.

Ploughshares was cited by senior White House officials as a chief architect of this campaign, which flooded the media with various experts touting the deal.

Ploughshares requested the $750,000 in order to solidify its pro-Iran network and bring others into the fold, according to the funding request.

This included efforts to “broaden and better coordinate circle of experts and validators who support diplomacy, including prominent US, European and Israeli military and diplomatic personalities, as well as Iranian human rights and civil society leaders,” according to the document.

Ploughshares raised concerns that opponents of the deal would scuttle negotiations before the administration achieved a final agreement.

“One potential risk is that unforeseen events or actions by opponents in the US, Iran, Saudi Arabia or Israel somehow make a deal impossible before the grant is fully implemented,” the document states. “Another potential risk is that negotiations on an accord or implementation phases extend beyond timeframe of the grant, and opportunities to derail diplomacy persist after resources might have been expended.”

The money would be used to facilitate “mainstream and social media outreach by validators along with other public and private efforts to shape the debate in support of an agreement and continued diplomacy,” the request states.

Ploughshares also hoped to “increase outreach by coalition members and validators to policymakers with focus on long-term impact of the deal on regional and global security issues where potential cooperation with Iran could be beneficial.”

The request provides a glimpse into efforts by the White House and its allies to strengthen its grasp on the media in order to prevent negative coverage of the Iran agreement.

NPR reportedly took money from Ploughshares in order to put pro-agreement commentators on while canceling appearances by lawmakers opposed.  Needless to say, they didn't disclose this cozy arrangement.

Ploughshares helped sell the American people a bill of goods.  And one of the true ironies of this P.R. campaign is that deal boosters were railing against all the money deal opponents were spending to defeat the agreement.

With Soros backing the boosters, there was little chance they would be outspent.