Is it too late for Trump to make inroads with Hispanics?

You should never say never in politics which is why Donald Trump may be softening his position on illegal aliens.

In a bid to win back at least some Hispanic voters, Trump said at a meeting of his Hispanic Advisory Council that he would have a plan this week on how to deal with illegal aliens in the US beyond deportation. 

NBC News:

Three of the Hispanics who are part of Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council spoke with NBC Latino after the meeting. Each spoke of an "open-minded" Trump who asked for their ideas on how to address the estimated 11 million people in the country without legal status.

Trump is to hold a news conference and rally in Colorado next Thursday and they said they expect details will come then.

RELATED: Republican Latinos in Swing-State Florida Publicly Support Trump

"I think on Thursday we are going to have a plan that every Latino Democratic or Republican can be proud of as a very realistic, compassionate way of solving the problem," said Jacob Monty, an immigration attorney from Houston who also chairs the Latino-Jewis Alliance.

There was some discussion after the meeting that Trump was going to back a legalization plan for the 11 million undocumented, but none of those interviewed would verify that.

"If all we got was touchback, I think that would be huge," Monty said referring to a policy that would require immigrants here illegally to return to their home countries and apply for a visa to return to the U.S. Such a policy was proposed in 2007 and was part of a plan floated by Trump's running mate Mike Pence, when he served in Congress.

"If all we got was re-examining the three and 10-year bars, even if we got a guest worker program that just allowed for some of the people to take advantage I would be very happy," he said.

The three- and 10-year bars are part of immigration law that came about in the Bill Clinton administration and prohibit anyone who has been found to have been in the country illegally from returning to the U.S. for three years or 10 years depending on how long they were in this country illegally.

Trump has been slumping in the polls. The latest NBC battleground map shows Clinton surging past Trump in electoral votes.

He has done poorly with Hispanics, hurt from the beginning when he opened his presidential bid by declaring that Mexico sends Mexicans who are rapists and bring crime and drugs. Polls have shown about 80 percent of Latinos opposed him.

There are polls, and then there are polls. Where many polls show Trump support among Hispanics at 20% or less, other recent polls have shown the candidate receiving about as much Hispanic support as Mitt Romney received in 2012 - about 27%.

But for every Hispanic vote he gains by perhaps going with the "touchback" option, he is likely to lose support with his base. It's a balancing act where Trump is going to have to appear tough on illegals while holding out hope that many of them can return someday.

Many Hispanics are still willing to listen to Trump if he has something meaningful to say. Can he reverse the opinion many Hispanics have of him? 

Never say never in politics.

You should never say never in politics which is why Donald Trump may be softening his position on illegal aliens.

In a bid to win back at least some Hispanic voters, Trump said at a meeting of his Hispanic Advisory Council that he would have a plan this week on how to deal with illegal aliens in the US beyond deportation. 

NBC News:

Three of the Hispanics who are part of Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council spoke with NBC Latino after the meeting. Each spoke of an "open-minded" Trump who asked for their ideas on how to address the estimated 11 million people in the country without legal status.

Trump is to hold a news conference and rally in Colorado next Thursday and they said they expect details will come then.

RELATED: Republican Latinos in Swing-State Florida Publicly Support Trump

"I think on Thursday we are going to have a plan that every Latino Democratic or Republican can be proud of as a very realistic, compassionate way of solving the problem," said Jacob Monty, an immigration attorney from Houston who also chairs the Latino-Jewis Alliance.

There was some discussion after the meeting that Trump was going to back a legalization plan for the 11 million undocumented, but none of those interviewed would verify that.

"If all we got was touchback, I think that would be huge," Monty said referring to a policy that would require immigrants here illegally to return to their home countries and apply for a visa to return to the U.S. Such a policy was proposed in 2007 and was part of a plan floated by Trump's running mate Mike Pence, when he served in Congress.

"If all we got was re-examining the three and 10-year bars, even if we got a guest worker program that just allowed for some of the people to take advantage I would be very happy," he said.

The three- and 10-year bars are part of immigration law that came about in the Bill Clinton administration and prohibit anyone who has been found to have been in the country illegally from returning to the U.S. for three years or 10 years depending on how long they were in this country illegally.

Trump has been slumping in the polls. The latest NBC battleground map shows Clinton surging past Trump in electoral votes.

He has done poorly with Hispanics, hurt from the beginning when he opened his presidential bid by declaring that Mexico sends Mexicans who are rapists and bring crime and drugs. Polls have shown about 80 percent of Latinos opposed him.

There are polls, and then there are polls. Where many polls show Trump support among Hispanics at 20% or less, other recent polls have shown the candidate receiving about as much Hispanic support as Mitt Romney received in 2012 - about 27%.

But for every Hispanic vote he gains by perhaps going with the "touchback" option, he is likely to lose support with his base. It's a balancing act where Trump is going to have to appear tough on illegals while holding out hope that many of them can return someday.

Many Hispanics are still willing to listen to Trump if he has something meaningful to say. Can he reverse the opinion many Hispanics have of him? 

Never say never in politics.