California now requires teaching public school children about sexual consent

Despite its wealth and high-technology leadership, California boasts one of the worst public school systems in the nation.

Completed by the nonprofit Education Week, the “Quality Counts” report gives California a D-plus grade and ranked it 42nd among states based on key education performance indicators.

But never let it be said that the one-party state led by Governor Jerry Brown doesn’t have its priorities straight.  Kate Stronger of LA School Report:

California is pioneering a solution, and it’s starting with sex education and the issue that many of these assault cases turn on — consent.

This school year, the state will be the first in the U.S. to require that high schools teach sexual consent — what it is and how it’s established. While some high schools already taught consent, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law in October 2015 requiring all schools that mandate health courses to do so beginning in the 2016 school year.

“Our dedication to a more comprehensive approach to sex ed — principles that are evidenced based, culturally appropriate, nonjudgemental, the whole thing about establishing parameters about not having sex — is really revolutionary, positively revolutionary, because none of the other states are dealing with those issues,” said Claire Brindis, a pediatrics professor and adolescent health policy researcher at University of California, San Francisco.

[Cough] It’s also going to make California lawyers very happy.

Hat tip: VM

Despite its wealth and high-technology leadership, California boasts one of the worst public school systems in the nation.

Completed by the nonprofit Education Week, the “Quality Counts” report gives California a D-plus grade and ranked it 42nd among states based on key education performance indicators.

But never let it be said that the one-party state led by Governor Jerry Brown doesn’t have its priorities straight.  Kate Stronger of LA School Report:

California is pioneering a solution, and it’s starting with sex education and the issue that many of these assault cases turn on — consent.

This school year, the state will be the first in the U.S. to require that high schools teach sexual consent — what it is and how it’s established. While some high schools already taught consent, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law in October 2015 requiring all schools that mandate health courses to do so beginning in the 2016 school year.

“Our dedication to a more comprehensive approach to sex ed — principles that are evidenced based, culturally appropriate, nonjudgemental, the whole thing about establishing parameters about not having sex — is really revolutionary, positively revolutionary, because none of the other states are dealing with those issues,” said Claire Brindis, a pediatrics professor and adolescent health policy researcher at University of California, San Francisco.

[Cough] It’s also going to make California lawyers very happy.

Hat tip: VM