Le Pen must avoid the LGBT trap

In recent polls, Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National (F.N.) in France, is holding her own, placing consistently at about 30%, which is at or in the lead for the 2017 French presidential election.

But like other nationalist leaders among the West leading the fight against Islamification, Le Pen has an Achilles heel: the LGBT activists, who have been trying desperately in recent times to influence, and ultimately commandeer, conservative parties, from Donald Trump's campaign (see, e.g., Milo Yiannopoulos) to Canada's federal and provincial conservative parties (i.e., LGBTory.ca and Stephen Harper's "gay mafia" leadership team).

On Saturday, the Gay Pride march in Paris caused a split in the F.N., "with some supporting the parade while others condemned it as 'exhibitionist'."

Le Pen's partner, Louis Aliot, who is also a vice president in the F.N., indicated that "[t]he F.N. does not support the Gay Pride March, an exhibitionist and anti-F.N. symbol of militant communitarianism."

Ms. Le Pen is in a quandary, and largely one of her own making, since one of her deputies, Florian Philippot, was outed as gay by a magazine two years ago, which explains her silence on the furor caused by the latest march in France's capital.

The F.N.'s founder, Jean-Marie Le Pen, who was unwisely expelled from the party last year, has taken the position that homosexuality is "a biological and social anomaly," placing his views more in line with the bulk of the F.N.'s base and much of French society, many of whom do not believe that homosexuality should be accepted and whose views about homosexuality appear to be becoming less tolerant over time, not more.

The "rising star" of the F.N., Marine's 26-year-old niece, Marion Maréchal-Le Pen, has also expressed serious concerns that the party "was being taken over by a gay cabal," which places Marine in a difficult position vis-à-vis not only her own party, but also her own family.

In the run-up to France's critical 2017 election, which could provide the opportunity for a Le Pen victory, a subsequent referendum on EU membership, and – if successful – a rapid Frexit, Le Pen must avoid the same trap that has befallen her North American counterparts – namely, sacrificing the large social conservative nationalist vote for the very small amount of LGBT support from liberals and so-called moderates.

In recent polls, Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National (F.N.) in France, is holding her own, placing consistently at about 30%, which is at or in the lead for the 2017 French presidential election.

But like other nationalist leaders among the West leading the fight against Islamification, Le Pen has an Achilles heel: the LGBT activists, who have been trying desperately in recent times to influence, and ultimately commandeer, conservative parties, from Donald Trump's campaign (see, e.g., Milo Yiannopoulos) to Canada's federal and provincial conservative parties (i.e., LGBTory.ca and Stephen Harper's "gay mafia" leadership team).

On Saturday, the Gay Pride march in Paris caused a split in the F.N., "with some supporting the parade while others condemned it as 'exhibitionist'."

Le Pen's partner, Louis Aliot, who is also a vice president in the F.N., indicated that "[t]he F.N. does not support the Gay Pride March, an exhibitionist and anti-F.N. symbol of militant communitarianism."

Ms. Le Pen is in a quandary, and largely one of her own making, since one of her deputies, Florian Philippot, was outed as gay by a magazine two years ago, which explains her silence on the furor caused by the latest march in France's capital.

The F.N.'s founder, Jean-Marie Le Pen, who was unwisely expelled from the party last year, has taken the position that homosexuality is "a biological and social anomaly," placing his views more in line with the bulk of the F.N.'s base and much of French society, many of whom do not believe that homosexuality should be accepted and whose views about homosexuality appear to be becoming less tolerant over time, not more.

The "rising star" of the F.N., Marine's 26-year-old niece, Marion Maréchal-Le Pen, has also expressed serious concerns that the party "was being taken over by a gay cabal," which places Marine in a difficult position vis-à-vis not only her own party, but also her own family.

In the run-up to France's critical 2017 election, which could provide the opportunity for a Le Pen victory, a subsequent referendum on EU membership, and – if successful – a rapid Frexit, Le Pen must avoid the same trap that has befallen her North American counterparts – namely, sacrificing the large social conservative nationalist vote for the very small amount of LGBT support from liberals and so-called moderates.