If the 33K emails still exist: the scenarios

If the 33,000 emails that Hillary deleted off her server were hacked and still exist, what could be the consequences? 

Forensically scrubbing the hard drive is a few steps beyond a simple deleting.  The “yoga” emails must have been quite personal, and perhaps from the look of things, revealing a complete personal failure.  Or perhaps the substance of the emails is damning.  If the emails still exist, what would be the most damaging scenario for Hillary, for the country?

A release just prior to the election

If Wikileaks or another entity comes forth and releases tranches of thought to be deleted emails just prior to the presidential election, it could scuttle Hillary’s election.  But would that serve to produce the desired effect? That desire would certainly be subject to the entity controlling the release.  If the goal would be to prevent Hillary from being president, the timing would fit.  But if the objective is deeper, if there is a desire to allow her to be president  and only then play “the card,” the consequences for the country might be deeper.  Our enemies might enjoy another plot.

If Hillary is elected, the secret emails might become a huge bargaining chip, and one that could be used to ill effect on our country.  Theoretically, Hillary as president could be blackmailed by the holder of these emails.  The price might not be in money terms but in policy adjustments.  The potential consequences are limited only by one’s imagination.

The sway which the blackmailer possessed would be substantial.  Hillary might do anything, anything, to avoid a release that could potentially lead to impeachment and ruin her legacy.  Her appeasement of any blackmailing scheme likely would be behind the scenes and beyond detection. 

Of course, if Hillary loses, any release of the secret emails which might detail an international shakedown scheme for the Clinton Foundation via the Secretary of State’s office, or a collusion between the Hillary camp and the DNC would be of high interest, but of little effect.  Suspicions confirmed.

If the 33,000 emails that Hillary deleted off her server were hacked and still exist, what could be the consequences? 

Forensically scrubbing the hard drive is a few steps beyond a simple deleting.  The “yoga” emails must have been quite personal, and perhaps from the look of things, revealing a complete personal failure.  Or perhaps the substance of the emails is damning.  If the emails still exist, what would be the most damaging scenario for Hillary, for the country?

A release just prior to the election

If Wikileaks or another entity comes forth and releases tranches of thought to be deleted emails just prior to the presidential election, it could scuttle Hillary’s election.  But would that serve to produce the desired effect? That desire would certainly be subject to the entity controlling the release.  If the goal would be to prevent Hillary from being president, the timing would fit.  But if the objective is deeper, if there is a desire to allow her to be president  and only then play “the card,” the consequences for the country might be deeper.  Our enemies might enjoy another plot.

If Hillary is elected, the secret emails might become a huge bargaining chip, and one that could be used to ill effect on our country.  Theoretically, Hillary as president could be blackmailed by the holder of these emails.  The price might not be in money terms but in policy adjustments.  The potential consequences are limited only by one’s imagination.

The sway which the blackmailer possessed would be substantial.  Hillary might do anything, anything, to avoid a release that could potentially lead to impeachment and ruin her legacy.  Her appeasement of any blackmailing scheme likely would be behind the scenes and beyond detection. 

Of course, if Hillary loses, any release of the secret emails which might detail an international shakedown scheme for the Clinton Foundation via the Secretary of State’s office, or a collusion between the Hillary camp and the DNC would be of high interest, but of little effect.  Suspicions confirmed.