Hillary’s missing emails

Now that the State Department has released the emails Hillary Clinton didn’t comprehensively scrub, and Wikileaks has released a trove of State Department cable traffic, it is possible to compare the two records.  Peter Schweizer, author of Clinton Cash, has done an analysis of the two archives and writes in Politico about “The Strange Gaps in Hillary Clinton’s Email Traffic.”  He discovers that in some instances, the volume of State Department and Clinton email traffic rose in tandem during certain important occasions.  For example, the earthquake and aftermath in Haiti or the military coup in Honduras.

But there are a couple of very interesting surges in State Department traffic accompanied by near silence in the Hillary Clinton record:

… the case of Rosatom, the Russian State Nuclear Agency: Clinton and senior officials at the State Department received dozens of cables on the subject of Rosatom’s activities around the world, including a hair-raising cable about Russian efforts to dominate the uranium market. As secretary of state, Clinton was a central player in a variety of diplomatic initiatives involving Rosatom officials. But strangely, there is only one email that mentions Rosatom in Clinton’s entire collection, an innocuous email about Rosatom’s activities in Ecuador. To put that into perspective, there are more mentions of LeBron James, yoga and NBC’s Saturday Night Live than the Russian Nuclear Agency in Clinton’s emails deemed “official.”

Rosatom, of course, is one of the most controversial beneficiaries of Hillary’s term in office:

Remember that a major deal involving Rosatom that was of vital concern to Clinton Foundation donors went down in 2009 and 2010. Rosatom bought a small Canadian uranium company owned by nine investors who were or became major Clinton Foundation donors, sending $145 million in contributions. The Rosatom deal required approval from several departments, including the State Department.

 Another gap: Bubba.

Equally bizarre is the absence at certain times of basic logistical emails pertaining to Hillary Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton. In general, Bill gets plenty of mention in the official emails released by the State Department, emails covering everything from travel logistics to press releases about Clinton Foundation work. But there’s an email silence in June 2010, when Hillary Clinton was in South America for a series of high-level meetings. According to her memoir, “by coincidence” Bill was in Bogota, Colombia, apparently for Clinton Foundation work, at the same time she was in the country. Also there with Bill was Frank Giustra, one of the Clinton Foundation’s largest contributors. Bill, Hillary and Giustra reportedly had dinner together, and the next morning, Bill met with Colombia’s President Alvaro Uribe, followed immediately by Hillary’s meeting with Uribe. In the weeks that follow, Giustra’s companies scored concessions from the Colombian government on matters ranging from oil to timber.

The actions of Team Hillary in carefully and comprehensively deleting email records after what Director Comey described as a recklessly hasty process of review – checking only subject lines, not the bodies of emails – ought to be prima facie evidence of obstruction.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

Now that the State Department has released the emails Hillary Clinton didn’t comprehensively scrub, and Wikileaks has released a trove of State Department cable traffic, it is possible to compare the two records.  Peter Schweizer, author of Clinton Cash, has done an analysis of the two archives and writes in Politico about “The Strange Gaps in Hillary Clinton’s Email Traffic.”  He discovers that in some instances, the volume of State Department and Clinton email traffic rose in tandem during certain important occasions.  For example, the earthquake and aftermath in Haiti or the military coup in Honduras.

But there are a couple of very interesting surges in State Department traffic accompanied by near silence in the Hillary Clinton record:

… the case of Rosatom, the Russian State Nuclear Agency: Clinton and senior officials at the State Department received dozens of cables on the subject of Rosatom’s activities around the world, including a hair-raising cable about Russian efforts to dominate the uranium market. As secretary of state, Clinton was a central player in a variety of diplomatic initiatives involving Rosatom officials. But strangely, there is only one email that mentions Rosatom in Clinton’s entire collection, an innocuous email about Rosatom’s activities in Ecuador. To put that into perspective, there are more mentions of LeBron James, yoga and NBC’s Saturday Night Live than the Russian Nuclear Agency in Clinton’s emails deemed “official.”

Rosatom, of course, is one of the most controversial beneficiaries of Hillary’s term in office:

Remember that a major deal involving Rosatom that was of vital concern to Clinton Foundation donors went down in 2009 and 2010. Rosatom bought a small Canadian uranium company owned by nine investors who were or became major Clinton Foundation donors, sending $145 million in contributions. The Rosatom deal required approval from several departments, including the State Department.

 Another gap: Bubba.

Equally bizarre is the absence at certain times of basic logistical emails pertaining to Hillary Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton. In general, Bill gets plenty of mention in the official emails released by the State Department, emails covering everything from travel logistics to press releases about Clinton Foundation work. But there’s an email silence in June 2010, when Hillary Clinton was in South America for a series of high-level meetings. According to her memoir, “by coincidence” Bill was in Bogota, Colombia, apparently for Clinton Foundation work, at the same time she was in the country. Also there with Bill was Frank Giustra, one of the Clinton Foundation’s largest contributors. Bill, Hillary and Giustra reportedly had dinner together, and the next morning, Bill met with Colombia’s President Alvaro Uribe, followed immediately by Hillary’s meeting with Uribe. In the weeks that follow, Giustra’s companies scored concessions from the Colombian government on matters ranging from oil to timber.

The actions of Team Hillary in carefully and comprehensively deleting email records after what Director Comey described as a recklessly hasty process of review – checking only subject lines, not the bodies of emails – ought to be prima facie evidence of obstruction.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky