Disabled teenager beaten up by TSA agents

A year ago, Hannah Cohen and her family were returning to their home in Chattanooga, flying from the Memphis airport following annual cancer treatments at St. Jude hospital.

They had made the trip many times.  But on June 30. 2015, Hannah didn't make it past the security checkpoint.  Hit and Run picks up the narrative:

Her years of treatment left the teenager partially deaf, blind in one eye, and limited in her abilities to walk and talk. She also, according to her mother, can become easily confused.

When Hannah went through the metal detector at the airport, an alarm went off. Disoriented by the noise, she did not immediately cooperate with TSA agents who asked to conduct further screening.

Shirley Cohen tried to inform the agents about her daughter's disabilities, she told television station WREG, but airport police kept her away. That's when the situation between Hannah and the TSA officials became violent:

"She's trying to get away from them but in the next instant, one of them had her down on the ground and hit her head on the floor. There was blood everywhere," said [Shirley].

Security personnel arrested Hannah (though all charges against her were later dropped), and what should have been a night of celebration with family and friends because a night of terror and confusion in a jail cell.

A year later, the family is suing the airport, its police, and the TSA for damages, including medical expenses and emotional injuries. According to the lawsuit, they are asking for a "reasonable sum not exceeding $100,000 and costs."

What brave TSA agents we have.  Did they give a medal to the hero who threw the little girl to the ground and busted her head open?

There have been so many outrages committed by TSA personnel over the years that we've become inured to their incompetence and arrogance.  What it comes down to is this: the culture in the TSA ecourages a lack of accountability, promotion of managers who deserve to be fired, poor training of agents, and an entitled arrogance from top to bottom. 

And the traveling public are the victims.

A year ago, Hannah Cohen and her family were returning to their home in Chattanooga, flying from the Memphis airport following annual cancer treatments at St. Jude hospital.

They had made the trip many times.  But on June 30. 2015, Hannah didn't make it past the security checkpoint.  Hit and Run picks up the narrative:

Her years of treatment left the teenager partially deaf, blind in one eye, and limited in her abilities to walk and talk. She also, according to her mother, can become easily confused.

When Hannah went through the metal detector at the airport, an alarm went off. Disoriented by the noise, she did not immediately cooperate with TSA agents who asked to conduct further screening.

Shirley Cohen tried to inform the agents about her daughter's disabilities, she told television station WREG, but airport police kept her away. That's when the situation between Hannah and the TSA officials became violent:

"She's trying to get away from them but in the next instant, one of them had her down on the ground and hit her head on the floor. There was blood everywhere," said [Shirley].

Security personnel arrested Hannah (though all charges against her were later dropped), and what should have been a night of celebration with family and friends because a night of terror and confusion in a jail cell.

A year later, the family is suing the airport, its police, and the TSA for damages, including medical expenses and emotional injuries. According to the lawsuit, they are asking for a "reasonable sum not exceeding $100,000 and costs."

What brave TSA agents we have.  Did they give a medal to the hero who threw the little girl to the ground and busted her head open?

There have been so many outrages committed by TSA personnel over the years that we've become inured to their incompetence and arrogance.  What it comes down to is this: the culture in the TSA ecourages a lack of accountability, promotion of managers who deserve to be fired, poor training of agents, and an entitled arrogance from top to bottom. 

And the traveling public are the victims.