The most amusing Trump video ever

Social justice warrior critics of cultural appropriation, beware.  The video below will make your heads explode.  While that is not a bad thing, I do need to warn you out of a sense of...social justice. 

I came across this through a post on Legal Insurrection by Kemberlee Kaye, who took it at face value as a product of Japan, and expresses bewilderment at explaining it.

I don’t even know how to go about explaining what follows, but I can tell you that Donald Trump’s head is on a brontosaurus, in the trees, on dictatorial statues, and winking from a picture frame.

Closer inspection reveals it to be produced by Mike Shafia, assisted by a number of other people, only one of whom has a Japanese names, Mari Toyozumi, credited for Japanese translation.  So it belongs to the category of imitation J-pop culture, satirizing the often amusing takes modern Japanese people have of American culture.  It is a satirical cultural appropriation of cutural appropriators.

As someone who spent decades studying, researching, and teaching about Japan, I can explain that it doesn’t make sense because it isn’t supposed to.  And that is why it is so amusing, and somehow perfectly appropriate to the level of political commentary this election cycle.

In case you are wondering, the final frame featuring Japanese katakana and kanji reads, "Trump Banzai."

Social justice warrior critics of cultural appropriation, beware.  The video below will make your heads explode.  While that is not a bad thing, I do need to warn you out of a sense of...social justice. 

I came across this through a post on Legal Insurrection by Kemberlee Kaye, who took it at face value as a product of Japan, and expresses bewilderment at explaining it.

I don’t even know how to go about explaining what follows, but I can tell you that Donald Trump’s head is on a brontosaurus, in the trees, on dictatorial statues, and winking from a picture frame.

Closer inspection reveals it to be produced by Mike Shafia, assisted by a number of other people, only one of whom has a Japanese names, Mari Toyozumi, credited for Japanese translation.  So it belongs to the category of imitation J-pop culture, satirizing the often amusing takes modern Japanese people have of American culture.  It is a satirical cultural appropriation of cutural appropriators.

As someone who spent decades studying, researching, and teaching about Japan, I can explain that it doesn’t make sense because it isn’t supposed to.  And that is why it is so amusing, and somehow perfectly appropriate to the level of political commentary this election cycle.

In case you are wondering, the final frame featuring Japanese katakana and kanji reads, "Trump Banzai."