Sen. Sessions warns Ryan to adapt to Trump or leave office

Senator Jewff Sessions has a bit of friendly advice for Speaker Paul Ryan and other GOP leaders who are hesitant about endorsing Donald Trump. Or maybe it's more of a warning.

Accept the fact that Trump is the Republican nominee or leave office.

Politico:

“I think [Ryan] needs to recognize, on some of these issues, Trump is where the Republicans are and if you’re going to be a Republican leader you should be supportive of that,” Sessions told me during a taping of POLITICO’s “Off Message” podcast in his Senate office last week.

“My advice is to listen and accept the will of the American people, the Republican voters — the Republican Party is the Republican voters,” he added — a pointed reference to Ryan’s suggestion that he, and not the presumptive party nominee, represents authentic conservative values. “Give me a break! A lot of our drift within our party has gotten away from [the will of the voters]. … I think the leaders in all parties tend to adjust to reality. They just have to or they won’t remain in office. … Already many are sensing it.”

Trump has said he needs an experienced Washington hand as a running mate to offset his own inexperience, and Sessions (as you’d expect) has said: Oh gosh, not me. But he’s clearly positioned himself as Trump’s man on the Hill, and he told me he takes some satisfaction in watching the cloakroom skeptics line up behind a guy they once dismissed as a joke.

Sessions is deeply simpatico with Trump on immigration and taxes, and he’s a fervent, if recent, convert to the developer’s opposition to all free trade agreements (“I supported the Korean trade agreement in 2011,” he says sheepishly). But there’s a more visceral, pragmatic motive behind Sessions’ embrace of the big Yankee: survival. Win or lose, Trump has tapped into the GOP base’s deep feelings of alienation and Republican candidates of all stripes, and from all parts of the country, will adapt or die.

“He has said this is going to be a new Republican Party, a workers’ Republican Party, instead of just the elite Republican Party,” said Sessions, who was quietly ridiculed by other GOP senators when he embraced (but didn’t quite endorse) Trump last summer.

Sessions is absolutely correct. You can't have it both ways - denouncing Trump and remaining a Republican. You should either resign and leave office or get behind the nominee chosen by Republican voters.

Those Republicans toying with a third party candidate are delusional. Why not just start a "Republicans for Clinton" club and be done with it? There is nothing principled about actively undermining the only alternative to a Hillary Clinton presidency and those who insist a third party candidate can actually win are insane.

A political party is a voluntary association - except when you choose to help lead it. Then it becomes incumbent on a leader to bow to the will of the voter when they choose a nominee. Basic democracy 101. 

I expect several high profile Republicans to get that message eventually and either exit the party or support the nominee. Their hesitancy at this point is only helping Clinton.

 

Senator Jewff Sessions has a bit of friendly advice for Speaker Paul Ryan and other GOP leaders who are hesitant about endorsing Donald Trump. Or maybe it's more of a warning.

Accept the fact that Trump is the Republican nominee or leave office.

Politico:

“I think [Ryan] needs to recognize, on some of these issues, Trump is where the Republicans are and if you’re going to be a Republican leader you should be supportive of that,” Sessions told me during a taping of POLITICO’s “Off Message” podcast in his Senate office last week.

“My advice is to listen and accept the will of the American people, the Republican voters — the Republican Party is the Republican voters,” he added — a pointed reference to Ryan’s suggestion that he, and not the presumptive party nominee, represents authentic conservative values. “Give me a break! A lot of our drift within our party has gotten away from [the will of the voters]. … I think the leaders in all parties tend to adjust to reality. They just have to or they won’t remain in office. … Already many are sensing it.”

Trump has said he needs an experienced Washington hand as a running mate to offset his own inexperience, and Sessions (as you’d expect) has said: Oh gosh, not me. But he’s clearly positioned himself as Trump’s man on the Hill, and he told me he takes some satisfaction in watching the cloakroom skeptics line up behind a guy they once dismissed as a joke.

Sessions is deeply simpatico with Trump on immigration and taxes, and he’s a fervent, if recent, convert to the developer’s opposition to all free trade agreements (“I supported the Korean trade agreement in 2011,” he says sheepishly). But there’s a more visceral, pragmatic motive behind Sessions’ embrace of the big Yankee: survival. Win or lose, Trump has tapped into the GOP base’s deep feelings of alienation and Republican candidates of all stripes, and from all parts of the country, will adapt or die.

“He has said this is going to be a new Republican Party, a workers’ Republican Party, instead of just the elite Republican Party,” said Sessions, who was quietly ridiculed by other GOP senators when he embraced (but didn’t quite endorse) Trump last summer.

Sessions is absolutely correct. You can't have it both ways - denouncing Trump and remaining a Republican. You should either resign and leave office or get behind the nominee chosen by Republican voters.

Those Republicans toying with a third party candidate are delusional. Why not just start a "Republicans for Clinton" club and be done with it? There is nothing principled about actively undermining the only alternative to a Hillary Clinton presidency and those who insist a third party candidate can actually win are insane.

A political party is a voluntary association - except when you choose to help lead it. Then it becomes incumbent on a leader to bow to the will of the voter when they choose a nominee. Basic democracy 101. 

I expect several high profile Republicans to get that message eventually and either exit the party or support the nominee. Their hesitancy at this point is only helping Clinton.