Muslim politician threatens to rape women’s rights activist on live TV talk show

Hafiz Hamdullah, a member of the Senate of Pakistan and of the Jamiatul-Ulema-e-Islam (F) (JUI-F) party, which is part of the ruling coalition, became enraged while on a Pakistani television panel discussion show, 10PM with Nadia Mirza.  Facing criticism of honor killing from women’s rights activist Marvi Sirmed, he stood up, moved aggressively to her, and threatened to rape her.

The action begins at about 3:50 in this video of the segment, which includes the escalating argument among the panelists:

 

Hamdullah may be a mullah, according to T.K. Whiteman, although other English Language accounts from Australia and India do not refer to him as such.

In any event, following the broadcast, he was booked by police on a complaint by Ms. Sirmed.

Police said they registered the case against the lawmaker Tuesday having obtained video clips from the broadcaster after the activist filed a complaint Friday and claimed the whole incident was recorded.

The incident comes after a series of gruesome "honour killings" in the country.

Honor killing officially is illegal in Pakistan but is estimated to occur at least a thousand times a year in that nation.

And, quite obviously, the practice is defended by some lawmakers.   

Hat tip: Clarice Feldman

Hafiz Hamdullah, a member of the Senate of Pakistan and of the Jamiatul-Ulema-e-Islam (F) (JUI-F) party, which is part of the ruling coalition, became enraged while on a Pakistani television panel discussion show, 10PM with Nadia Mirza.  Facing criticism of honor killing from women’s rights activist Marvi Sirmed, he stood up, moved aggressively to her, and threatened to rape her.

The action begins at about 3:50 in this video of the segment, which includes the escalating argument among the panelists:

 

Hamdullah may be a mullah, according to T.K. Whiteman, although other English Language accounts from Australia and India do not refer to him as such.

In any event, following the broadcast, he was booked by police on a complaint by Ms. Sirmed.

Police said they registered the case against the lawmaker Tuesday having obtained video clips from the broadcaster after the activist filed a complaint Friday and claimed the whole incident was recorded.

The incident comes after a series of gruesome "honour killings" in the country.

Honor killing officially is illegal in Pakistan but is estimated to occur at least a thousand times a year in that nation.

And, quite obviously, the practice is defended by some lawmakers.   

Hat tip: Clarice Feldman