Michelle Obama uses commencement speech to attack Trump, border wall, without naming names

In this polarized season, it seems that leftists believe it is fine to hijack graduation ceremonies, which should be about the graduates, to score political points.  Matt Damon, for instance, thought it fine to attack Donald Trump, Brexit, and bankers, while plugging Elizabeth Warren, while dropping an s-bomb on the assembled grads and parents at MIT

By comparison, Michelle Obama was the soul of restraint speaking to the graduates of the City University of New York.

She made a thinly veiled reference to Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, by saying "some folks" don't value the diversity that City College embodies.

"They seem to view our diversity as a threat to be contained rather than as a resource to be tapped," Obama said. "They tell us to be afraid of those who are different, to be suspicious of those with whom we disagree.

"They act as if name-calling is an acceptable substitute for thoughtful debate, as if anger and intolerance should be our default state rather than the optimism and openness that have always been the engine of our progress."

Of course, Donald Trump never said any of these things, but then again, Michelle was slandering all conservatives.

And the First Lady, who lives behind a wall recently augmented, added:

"…here in America, we don't give in to our fears. We don't build up walls to keep people out because we know that our greatness has always depended on contributions from people who were born elsewhere but sought out this country and made it their home."

No distinction between those who come her legally and those who violate our borders.

Ads far as I can remember the practice of hijacking graduations first became nationally prominent when Hillary Rodham graduated from Wellesley College in 1969, and, speaking to the graduates, attacked Republican Senator Ed Brooke, the first post-Reconstruction black senator, over the Vietnam War.  For this, she was rewarded with a spread in Life Magazine, then the largest weekly magazine.

In this polarized season, it seems that leftists believe it is fine to hijack graduation ceremonies, which should be about the graduates, to score political points.  Matt Damon, for instance, thought it fine to attack Donald Trump, Brexit, and bankers, while plugging Elizabeth Warren, while dropping an s-bomb on the assembled grads and parents at MIT

By comparison, Michelle Obama was the soul of restraint speaking to the graduates of the City University of New York.

She made a thinly veiled reference to Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, by saying "some folks" don't value the diversity that City College embodies.

"They seem to view our diversity as a threat to be contained rather than as a resource to be tapped," Obama said. "They tell us to be afraid of those who are different, to be suspicious of those with whom we disagree.

"They act as if name-calling is an acceptable substitute for thoughtful debate, as if anger and intolerance should be our default state rather than the optimism and openness that have always been the engine of our progress."

Of course, Donald Trump never said any of these things, but then again, Michelle was slandering all conservatives.

And the First Lady, who lives behind a wall recently augmented, added:

"…here in America, we don't give in to our fears. We don't build up walls to keep people out because we know that our greatness has always depended on contributions from people who were born elsewhere but sought out this country and made it their home."

No distinction between those who come her legally and those who violate our borders.

Ads far as I can remember the practice of hijacking graduations first became nationally prominent when Hillary Rodham graduated from Wellesley College in 1969, and, speaking to the graduates, attacked Republican Senator Ed Brooke, the first post-Reconstruction black senator, over the Vietnam War.  For this, she was rewarded with a spread in Life Magazine, then the largest weekly magazine.