Washington Post has assigned 20 reporters to look for dirt on Trump

Bob Woodward has let the cat out of the bag: the Washington Post is all in on finding dirt, or as he put it, “doing articles about every phase of his life."  In these days of shrinking newsrooms, such a major bloc of editorial resources assigned to the life of a very public man is extraordinary. Pardon my skepticism, but I am doubtful that the Post has a comparable investment in examining every phase of Hillary Clinton’s (or Bernie Sanders’s) life.

Woodward dropped the bombshell in an address to the National Association of Realtors, for which he no doubt was well paid, though not in the $300,000 range commanded by Hillary Clinton. 

Paul Bedard reports in the Washington Examiner:

 Woodward, who has interviewed Trump, said that he has begun looking into Trump's New York real estate deals. "The New York real estate world is more complex than the CIA," he said.

The paper’s attitudes toward Hillary Clinton?

He also said that the paper is trying to get to the "essence" of Hillary Rodham Clinton, but he dismissed suggestions that she used a personal email server to distribute classified information.

"I don't think anyone feels that there was intent on her part to distribute classified information in a way that was illegal or jeopardized security," he assured the crowd.

This formulation is suspiciously close to the Hillary Party Line, emphasizing intent (“no emails marked as classified”) over negligence, and ignoring completely the question of motive in setting up a private, unsecured email server not subject to FOIA rewquests. Suspicion toward motive is well justified considering Hillary’s initial story, that she wanted the convenience of using one device, has been shown to be fraudulent, since she regularly had more than one such email-capable machine in her possession.

Where is the legendary skepticism of the Watergate reporter?

Woodward did promise the Post will cover both candidates in depth:

He said that Bezos has urged the Post to run as many stories on Trump and the other candidates so that voters can't say they didn't know about the eventual president.

"He said, 'Look the job at the Washington Post has to be tell us everything about who the eventual nominee will be in both parties, 15 part, 16 part series, 20 part series, we want to look at every part of their lives and we're never going get the whole story of course but we can get the best attainable," said the famed reporter.

Correction: I have been advised by Jennifer Lee, Manager, Communications of the Post, that the Examiner's contention here is inaccurate:

Jeff Bezos has had nothing to do with the decision publish a Trump book or the Trump reporting. Those decisions are made by our newsroom.

Hillary Clinton has enough scandals to occupy 40 reporters digging between now and November, starting with her remarkable cattle futures trading that netted her $100,000 when her husband was governor of Arkansas, and which, once that round figure was reached, was never again practiced, despite her demonstrably stellar skills at a highly risky investment field.

Bob Woodward has let the cat out of the bag: the Washington Post is all in on finding dirt, or as he put it, “doing articles about every phase of his life."  In these days of shrinking newsrooms, such a major bloc of editorial resources assigned to the life of a very public man is extraordinary. Pardon my skepticism, but I am doubtful that the Post has a comparable investment in examining every phase of Hillary Clinton’s (or Bernie Sanders’s) life.

Woodward dropped the bombshell in an address to the National Association of Realtors, for which he no doubt was well paid, though not in the $300,000 range commanded by Hillary Clinton. 

Bob Woodward, as portrayed by Robert Redford

Paul Bedard reports in the Washington Examiner:

 Woodward, who has interviewed Trump, said that he has begun looking into Trump's New York real estate deals. "The New York real estate world is more complex than the CIA," he said.

The paper’s attitudes toward Hillary Clinton?

He also said that the paper is trying to get to the "essence" of Hillary Rodham Clinton, but he dismissed suggestions that she used a personal email server to distribute classified information.

"I don't think anyone feels that there was intent on her part to distribute classified information in a way that was illegal or jeopardized security," he assured the crowd.

This formulation is suspiciously close to the Hillary Party Line, emphasizing intent (“no emails marked as classified”) over negligence, and ignoring completely the question of motive in setting up a private, unsecured email server not subject to FOIA rewquests. Suspicion toward motive is well justified considering Hillary’s initial story, that she wanted the convenience of using one device, has been shown to be fraudulent, since she regularly had more than one such email-capable machine in her possession.

Where is the legendary skepticism of the Watergate reporter?

Woodward did promise the Post will cover both candidates in depth:

He said that Bezos has urged the Post to run as many stories on Trump and the other candidates so that voters can't say they didn't know about the eventual president.

"He said, 'Look the job at the Washington Post has to be tell us everything about who the eventual nominee will be in both parties, 15 part, 16 part series, 20 part series, we want to look at every part of their lives and we're never going get the whole story of course but we can get the best attainable," said the famed reporter.

Correction: I have been advised by Jennifer Lee, Manager, Communications of the Post, that the Examiner's contention here is inaccurate:

Jeff Bezos has had nothing to do with the decision publish a Trump book or the Trump reporting. Those decisions are made by our newsroom.

Hillary Clinton has enough scandals to occupy 40 reporters digging between now and November, starting with her remarkable cattle futures trading that netted her $100,000 when her husband was governor of Arkansas, and which, once that round figure was reached, was never again practiced, despite her demonstrably stellar skills at a highly risky investment field.