Trump doesn't think the GOP needs to be unified for him to win

Donald Trump told ABC's "This Week" that he doesn't think the Republican party needs to be unified for him to win the presidency.

The Hill:

“Does the party have to be together, does it have to be unified?” he said during an interview on ABC’s “This Week” that will air Sunday. “I’m very different from anybody who’s perhaps ever run for office. I actually don’t think so.”

“I think it would be better if it were unified, I think there would be something good about it, but I don’t actually think it has to be unified," he said.

The presumptive GOP nominee said that he can win without the backing of the full party by drawing Democratic voters, specifically supporters of Bernie Sanders.

“I have to stay true to my principles also. And I’m a conservative, but don’t forget, this is called the ‘Republican Party,’ not the ‘conservative party,’” Trump said.

The Donald is correct. The GOP is no longer "the conservative party." Just 42% of Republicans identify as social and economic conservatives. That's the lowest it's been since 2001. 

But Trump may be whistling past the graveyard when he claims that GOP unity isn't necessary for him to win. And he is thinking magically if he actually expects Bernie Sanders supporters to vote for him. The fact is, Trump is likely to receive the lowest percentage of GOP support ever recorded. A recent Rasmussen survey showed 60% of Republican voters would definitely vote for Trump but 18% said they'd never vote for him. Since Mitt Romney received 93% GOP support in 2012, any number significantly less than that means that Trump is in big trouble.

And what of Trump's claim that he can attract Bernie Sanders supporters? By an 86-10 margin, Sanders voters reject  the idea of voting forTrump. 

No doubt Trump will attract many blue collar, white Democrats. But there simply aren't enough white people that can offset Trump's loss of Republican support.

The Donald better think twice about reaching out and trying to unify the party. He's going to need every Republican vote he can get to win the White House.

Donald Trump told ABC's "This Week" that he doesn't think the Republican party needs to be unified for him to win the presidency.

The Hill:

“Does the party have to be together, does it have to be unified?” he said during an interview on ABC’s “This Week” that will air Sunday. “I’m very different from anybody who’s perhaps ever run for office. I actually don’t think so.”

“I think it would be better if it were unified, I think there would be something good about it, but I don’t actually think it has to be unified," he said.

The presumptive GOP nominee said that he can win without the backing of the full party by drawing Democratic voters, specifically supporters of Bernie Sanders.

“I have to stay true to my principles also. And I’m a conservative, but don’t forget, this is called the ‘Republican Party,’ not the ‘conservative party,’” Trump said.

The Donald is correct. The GOP is no longer "the conservative party." Just 42% of Republicans identify as social and economic conservatives. That's the lowest it's been since 2001. 

But Trump may be whistling past the graveyard when he claims that GOP unity isn't necessary for him to win. And he is thinking magically if he actually expects Bernie Sanders supporters to vote for him. The fact is, Trump is likely to receive the lowest percentage of GOP support ever recorded. A recent Rasmussen survey showed 60% of Republican voters would definitely vote for Trump but 18% said they'd never vote for him. Since Mitt Romney received 93% GOP support in 2012, any number significantly less than that means that Trump is in big trouble.

And what of Trump's claim that he can attract Bernie Sanders supporters? By an 86-10 margin, Sanders voters reject  the idea of voting forTrump. 

No doubt Trump will attract many blue collar, white Democrats. But there simply aren't enough white people that can offset Trump's loss of Republican support.

The Donald better think twice about reaching out and trying to unify the party. He's going to need every Republican vote he can get to win the White House.