Iranian missile commander: US told us to keep banned missile tests secret

What kind of game is the U.S. playing with the Iranians?  Is the U.S. government telling the Iranians to secretly test its ballistic missiles, supposedly banned by the comprehensive nuclear agreement?  A speech given by  Amir Ali Hajizadeh, commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps’ Aerospace and Missile Force, translated by MEMRI, seem to indicate this.  Adam Kredo of the Free Beacon reports:

“At this time, the Americans are telling [us]: ‘Don’t talk about missile affairs, and if you conduct a test or maneuver, don’t mention it,’” Hajizadeh was quoted as saying during a recent Persian-language speech that was translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute.

The top missile official went on to denounce the American government, claiming it would escalate its demands:

“If we agree to this, they will advance another step, and say: ‘Don’t conduct [a missile test] at this time, and also don’t do it in the Persian Gulf region.’ After that, they will tell us: ‘Why do you need your missiles to have a range of 2,000 km [anyway?]?’ Hajizadeh reportedly said.

The military commander expressed concern that the United States will attempt to dissuade Iran from developing missile technology capable of carrying a nuclear payload.

“After that, they will tell [us]: ‘Next, we will check whether your missiles can really carry nuclear weapons. Bring us the details [of the missiles].’ After that, they will say: ‘We need to set up cameras.’ And, finally, they will say: ‘Either saw [the missiles up into pieces] or, like [Libyan dictator Mu’ammar] Gadhafi, load them onto a ship and hand [them] over to us.’” he said.

Hajizadeh further claimed that the United States “cannot be trusted.”

Iran, he said, “must face them down firmly, and we must act. If we do not, we will witness daily their exaggerated and evil demands.”

“They are clearly deluding themselves. Nothing like this will ever happen,” he added.

State Department officials contacted by the Free Beacon declined to comment.

Hat tip: Clarice Feldman

What kind of game is the U.S. playing with the Iranians?  Is the U.S. government telling the Iranians to secretly test its ballistic missiles, supposedly banned by the comprehensive nuclear agreement?  A speech given by  Amir Ali Hajizadeh, commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps’ Aerospace and Missile Force, translated by MEMRI, seem to indicate this.  Adam Kredo of the Free Beacon reports:

“At this time, the Americans are telling [us]: ‘Don’t talk about missile affairs, and if you conduct a test or maneuver, don’t mention it,’” Hajizadeh was quoted as saying during a recent Persian-language speech that was translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute.

The top missile official went on to denounce the American government, claiming it would escalate its demands:

“If we agree to this, they will advance another step, and say: ‘Don’t conduct [a missile test] at this time, and also don’t do it in the Persian Gulf region.’ After that, they will tell us: ‘Why do you need your missiles to have a range of 2,000 km [anyway?]?’ Hajizadeh reportedly said.

The military commander expressed concern that the United States will attempt to dissuade Iran from developing missile technology capable of carrying a nuclear payload.

“After that, they will tell [us]: ‘Next, we will check whether your missiles can really carry nuclear weapons. Bring us the details [of the missiles].’ After that, they will say: ‘We need to set up cameras.’ And, finally, they will say: ‘Either saw [the missiles up into pieces] or, like [Libyan dictator Mu’ammar] Gadhafi, load them onto a ship and hand [them] over to us.’” he said.

Hajizadeh further claimed that the United States “cannot be trusted.”

Iran, he said, “must face them down firmly, and we must act. If we do not, we will witness daily their exaggerated and evil demands.”

“They are clearly deluding themselves. Nothing like this will ever happen,” he added.

State Department officials contacted by the Free Beacon declined to comment.

Hat tip: Clarice Feldman