Washington Post: Trump claims $102 million charitable donations over last 5 years, but gave no personal cash

In a lengthy analysis of data provided by the Trump campaign, Washington Post writers David A. Fahrenthold and  Rosalind S. Heiderman find that claimed charitable contributions by Donald Trump included no actual cash from his personal funds.

Since the first day of his presidential campaign, Donald Trump has said that he gave more than $102 million to charity in the past five years.

To back up that claim, Trump’s campaign compiled a list of his contributions — 4,844 of them, filling 93 pages.

But, in that massive list, one thing was missing.

Not a single one of those donations was actually a personal gift of Trump’s own money.

Instead, according to a Washington Post analysis, many of the gifts that Trump cited to prove his generosity were free rounds of golf, given away by his courses for charity auctions and raffles.

Another substantial source of charitable deductions was “land-conservation agreements to forgo development rights on property Trump owns.”

Both of these categories of charity are entirely legitimate. But they do not involve taking money out of a bank and giving to others. Instead, they forego opportunities to make money in the future, and generate tax deductions today.

Additionally, the $102 million figure includes donations by the Donald J. Trump Foundation, but as the reporters show, funding for that foundation has, in recent years, come from others.

And there appears to have been sloppiness in compiling the list, for instance including sales promotion expenditures as charitable.

Quire clearly the Post does not like Trump and wants to debunk his charities. However, it acknbowledges that in the past he has been very generous with his cash:

In the early years of his career — when Trump was making a name as America’s human embodiment of success — he was known for acts of real, and well-publicized, philanthropy.

In 1986, Trump heard about a Georgia farmer who’d committed suicide because of an impending foreclosure. He reached out.

“He said, ‘Forget it. I’ll pay it off.’ He paid for it out of his personal money,” said Betsy Sharp, the daughter of the farmer, Leonard Hill III. Trump flew the family to Trump Tower to burn the hated mortgage in front of TV cameras, with an ebony cigarette lighter that said “New York.”

Quite clearly, Trump is good at self-promotion when it comes to charity. But he is, in fact, charitable, and we already know about the self-promotion. And a look at the naming of buildings on practically every college campus in America shows that self-promotion is a big part of charity.

In a lengthy analysis of data provided by the Trump campaign, Washington Post writers David A. Fahrenthold and  Rosalind S. Heiderman find that claimed charitable contributions by Donald Trump included no actual cash from his personal funds.

Since the first day of his presidential campaign, Donald Trump has said that he gave more than $102 million to charity in the past five years.

To back up that claim, Trump’s campaign compiled a list of his contributions — 4,844 of them, filling 93 pages.

But, in that massive list, one thing was missing.

Not a single one of those donations was actually a personal gift of Trump’s own money.

Instead, according to a Washington Post analysis, many of the gifts that Trump cited to prove his generosity were free rounds of golf, given away by his courses for charity auctions and raffles.

Another substantial source of charitable deductions was “land-conservation agreements to forgo development rights on property Trump owns.”

Both of these categories of charity are entirely legitimate. But they do not involve taking money out of a bank and giving to others. Instead, they forego opportunities to make money in the future, and generate tax deductions today.

Additionally, the $102 million figure includes donations by the Donald J. Trump Foundation, but as the reporters show, funding for that foundation has, in recent years, come from others.

And there appears to have been sloppiness in compiling the list, for instance including sales promotion expenditures as charitable.

Quire clearly the Post does not like Trump and wants to debunk his charities. However, it acknbowledges that in the past he has been very generous with his cash:

In the early years of his career — when Trump was making a name as America’s human embodiment of success — he was known for acts of real, and well-publicized, philanthropy.

In 1986, Trump heard about a Georgia farmer who’d committed suicide because of an impending foreclosure. He reached out.

“He said, ‘Forget it. I’ll pay it off.’ He paid for it out of his personal money,” said Betsy Sharp, the daughter of the farmer, Leonard Hill III. Trump flew the family to Trump Tower to burn the hated mortgage in front of TV cameras, with an ebony cigarette lighter that said “New York.”

Quite clearly, Trump is good at self-promotion when it comes to charity. But he is, in fact, charitable, and we already know about the self-promotion. And a look at the naming of buildings on practically every college campus in America shows that self-promotion is a big part of charity.