US to request Hiroshima visit by Obama

A senior government official quoted in a Japanese newspaper says that the U.S. will propose a visit to Hiroshima by President Obama in May following the G-7 summit.

If you liked Obama apologizing to the murderous Castros in Cuba, you're going to love what he has to say at the site of the first atomic bomb ever dropped.

Reuters:

Citing an unidentified senior U.S. government official, the business daily said Washington planned to propose to Tokyo a visit by the president on May 27, at the end of a Group of Seven (G7) summit hosted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

In Washington, a White House official said no decision has been made.

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga denied the visit was being arranged and declined further comment. Diplomatic protocol means any announcement should come from the U.S. side.

"It is not true that a visit to Hiroshima by President Obama is being arranged between the United States and Japan," Suga told a regular news conference.

"The schedule of the U.S. president is a matter for the United States to decide. The (Japanese) government will refrain from comment."

A U.S. warplane dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, killing thousands of people instantly and about 140,000 by the end of that year. Nagasaki was bombed on Aug. 9, 1945, and Japan surrendered six days later.

A presidential visit would be controversial in the United States if it were seen as an apology.

A majority of Americans view the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as justified to end the war and save U.S lives. The vast majority of Japanese think the bombings were unjustified.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said during a visit to the city this month that Obama wanted to travel there, although he did not know if the president's schedule when he visited Japan for the May 26-27 summit would allow him to.

Hiroshima bombing survivors, and other residents, have said they hope for progress in ridding the world of nuclear weapons, rather than an apology, if Obama makes the historic visit.

Hopes for Obama's visit to Hiroshima were raised after a speech in April 2009 in Prague when he called for a world without nuclear weapons. He later said he would be honored to visit the two cities that suffered nuclear attack.

I'm sure those surviving veterans of World War II would have a thing or two to say to President Obama if he apologizes for the U.S. shortening the war and saving millions of lives.  The planned invasion of the islands would have cost a million American casualties – about 250,000 dead.  Japanese losses, civilian and military, could have topped 2 million.  Many millions more across Asia were saved, as the war would have dragged on into at least 1947.

We are still handing out Purple Heart medals left over from that planned attack.

But none of this is as important as pandering to leftists around the world – and our former enemy, who has so sanitized its barbaric atrocities committed during the war as to make the history it teaches its children unrecognizable.

We dropped the bombs to wake up the Japanese government to the danger of its country's total destruction.  Before that, Japan's "peace" cabinet had proposed keeping the military in charge as well as allowing the country to keep some of its territorial gains.  It was a recipe for another war a decade or so later. 

We owe no one an apology. 

A senior government official quoted in a Japanese newspaper says that the U.S. will propose a visit to Hiroshima by President Obama in May following the G-7 summit.

If you liked Obama apologizing to the murderous Castros in Cuba, you're going to love what he has to say at the site of the first atomic bomb ever dropped.

Reuters:

Citing an unidentified senior U.S. government official, the business daily said Washington planned to propose to Tokyo a visit by the president on May 27, at the end of a Group of Seven (G7) summit hosted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

In Washington, a White House official said no decision has been made.

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga denied the visit was being arranged and declined further comment. Diplomatic protocol means any announcement should come from the U.S. side.

"It is not true that a visit to Hiroshima by President Obama is being arranged between the United States and Japan," Suga told a regular news conference.

"The schedule of the U.S. president is a matter for the United States to decide. The (Japanese) government will refrain from comment."

A U.S. warplane dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, killing thousands of people instantly and about 140,000 by the end of that year. Nagasaki was bombed on Aug. 9, 1945, and Japan surrendered six days later.

A presidential visit would be controversial in the United States if it were seen as an apology.

A majority of Americans view the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as justified to end the war and save U.S lives. The vast majority of Japanese think the bombings were unjustified.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said during a visit to the city this month that Obama wanted to travel there, although he did not know if the president's schedule when he visited Japan for the May 26-27 summit would allow him to.

Hiroshima bombing survivors, and other residents, have said they hope for progress in ridding the world of nuclear weapons, rather than an apology, if Obama makes the historic visit.

Hopes for Obama's visit to Hiroshima were raised after a speech in April 2009 in Prague when he called for a world without nuclear weapons. He later said he would be honored to visit the two cities that suffered nuclear attack.

I'm sure those surviving veterans of World War II would have a thing or two to say to President Obama if he apologizes for the U.S. shortening the war and saving millions of lives.  The planned invasion of the islands would have cost a million American casualties – about 250,000 dead.  Japanese losses, civilian and military, could have topped 2 million.  Many millions more across Asia were saved, as the war would have dragged on into at least 1947.

We are still handing out Purple Heart medals left over from that planned attack.

But none of this is as important as pandering to leftists around the world – and our former enemy, who has so sanitized its barbaric atrocities committed during the war as to make the history it teaches its children unrecognizable.

We dropped the bombs to wake up the Japanese government to the danger of its country's total destruction.  Before that, Japan's "peace" cabinet had proposed keeping the military in charge as well as allowing the country to keep some of its territorial gains.  It was a recipe for another war a decade or so later. 

We owe no one an apology.