UN ambassador Samantha Power's motorcade in Cameroon strikes and kills 7-year-old boy

It’s not a good look for the convoy of a crusader against genocide to mow down a little African boy as her motorcade roars through a rural area at high speed (often exceeding 60 miles per hour on two-lane country roads), accompanied by a helicopter overhead, journalists in tow, eager for a photo op with refugees.  But that was the situation facing Samantha Power yesterday in Cameroon.  The Associated Press reports:

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power’s trip to Cameroon’s front lines in the war against Boko Haram started horrifically today as an armored jeep in her motorcade struck and killed a young boy who darted into the road.

The incident occurred near the small city of Mokolo, in northern Cameroon, where Power, her aides and accompanying journalists were headed to meet refugees and others displaced by the years of brutal attacks across West Africa.

All those meetings included small children.

Power, a journalist, achieved fame, academic standing, fortune, and high office by self-righteously denouncing the callousness of Western powers in the face of genocide.  But since becoming Barack Obama’s U.N. ambassador, she has remained in office as his administration stood by as hundreds of thousands were slaughtered in Syria, not resigning in protest.  Those perks of office – like armored motorcades though impoverished areas afflicted by genocidal forces – must be hard to give up.

Power’s motorcade did not even stop:

The vehicle that hit the boy initially stopped, but was ordered by American security forces to continue traveling through the unsecured area. An ambulance in the U.S. caravan immediately attended to him.

Playing the grandee, Power returned returned hours later:

Power returned to the scene of the bloody accident several hours later to meet the 7-year-old boy’s mother and father, while residents of his village stood solemnly on a sandy expanse.

Lest anyone think she was self-important:

The motorcade moved at a significantly slower pace for the rest of the day.

It’s not a good look for the convoy of a crusader against genocide to mow down a little African boy as her motorcade roars through a rural area at high speed (often exceeding 60 miles per hour on two-lane country roads), accompanied by a helicopter overhead, journalists in tow, eager for a photo op with refugees.  But that was the situation facing Samantha Power yesterday in Cameroon.  The Associated Press reports:

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power’s trip to Cameroon’s front lines in the war against Boko Haram started horrifically today as an armored jeep in her motorcade struck and killed a young boy who darted into the road.

The incident occurred near the small city of Mokolo, in northern Cameroon, where Power, her aides and accompanying journalists were headed to meet refugees and others displaced by the years of brutal attacks across West Africa.

All those meetings included small children.

Power, a journalist, achieved fame, academic standing, fortune, and high office by self-righteously denouncing the callousness of Western powers in the face of genocide.  But since becoming Barack Obama’s U.N. ambassador, she has remained in office as his administration stood by as hundreds of thousands were slaughtered in Syria, not resigning in protest.  Those perks of office – like armored motorcades though impoverished areas afflicted by genocidal forces – must be hard to give up.

Power’s motorcade did not even stop:

The vehicle that hit the boy initially stopped, but was ordered by American security forces to continue traveling through the unsecured area. An ambulance in the U.S. caravan immediately attended to him.

Playing the grandee, Power returned returned hours later:

Power returned to the scene of the bloody accident several hours later to meet the 7-year-old boy’s mother and father, while residents of his village stood solemnly on a sandy expanse.

Lest anyone think she was self-important:

The motorcade moved at a significantly slower pace for the rest of the day.