Obama may release parts of the 28 classified pages from 911 probe

President Obama may soon release parts of the 28 classified pages from the joint House-Senate intel committee investigations into the 9/11 attacks.  National director of intelligence James Clapper is currently reviewing the documents and will decide what parts could be released to the public.

Fox News:

The documents, kept in a secure room in the basement of the Capitol, contain information from the joint congressional inquiry into "specific sources of foreign support for some of the Sept. 11 hijackers while they were in the United States."

Graham, who has pressed for the documents to be made public, and others say the documents point suspicion at the Saudis.

The disclosure would come at a time of strained U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia, a long-time American ally.

"I hope that decision is to honor the American people and make it available," Graham told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. "The most important unanswered question of 9/11 is, did these 19 people conduct this very sophisticated plot alone, or were they supported?"

Tim Roemer, who was a member of both the joint congressional inquiry as well as the 9/11 Commission and has read the secret chapter three times, described the 28 pages as a "preliminary police report."

"There were clues. There were allegations. There were witness reports. There was evidence about the hijackers, about people they met with -- all kinds of different things that the 9/11 Commission was then tasked with reviewing and investigating," the former Democratic congressman from Indiana said Friday.

Fifteen of the 19 hijackers were citizens of Saudi Arabia. The Saudi government says it has been "wrongfully and morbidly accused of complicity" in the attacks, is fighting extremists and working to clamp down on their funding channels. Still, the Saudis have long said that they would welcome declassification of the 28 pages because it would "allow us to respond to any allegations in a clear and credible manner."

The pages were withheld from the 838-page report on the orders of President George W. Bush, who said the release could divulge intelligence sources and methods. Still, protecting U.S.-Saudi diplomatic relations also was believed to have been a factor.

Frankly, it's a mistake not to release the documents in their entirety.  There is already suspicion of a cover-up, and, barring the exposure of intelligence methods and assets, the whole story should be laid out for the families of 9/11 victims and the American people.

Judging by what was in the 9/11 Commission report on the Saudi connection, it's likely that accomplices with close ties to the Saudi monarchy are named.  Perhaps even minor royals are mentioned in the classified pages.  It may cause even more friction between the two countries, but the Saudis need us as much as we need them.  There shouldn't be a serious breach in our relationship.

President Obama may soon release parts of the 28 classified pages from the joint House-Senate intel committee investigations into the 9/11 attacks.  National director of intelligence James Clapper is currently reviewing the documents and will decide what parts could be released to the public.

Fox News:

The documents, kept in a secure room in the basement of the Capitol, contain information from the joint congressional inquiry into "specific sources of foreign support for some of the Sept. 11 hijackers while they were in the United States."

Graham, who has pressed for the documents to be made public, and others say the documents point suspicion at the Saudis.

The disclosure would come at a time of strained U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia, a long-time American ally.

"I hope that decision is to honor the American people and make it available," Graham told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. "The most important unanswered question of 9/11 is, did these 19 people conduct this very sophisticated plot alone, or were they supported?"

Tim Roemer, who was a member of both the joint congressional inquiry as well as the 9/11 Commission and has read the secret chapter three times, described the 28 pages as a "preliminary police report."

"There were clues. There were allegations. There were witness reports. There was evidence about the hijackers, about people they met with -- all kinds of different things that the 9/11 Commission was then tasked with reviewing and investigating," the former Democratic congressman from Indiana said Friday.

Fifteen of the 19 hijackers were citizens of Saudi Arabia. The Saudi government says it has been "wrongfully and morbidly accused of complicity" in the attacks, is fighting extremists and working to clamp down on their funding channels. Still, the Saudis have long said that they would welcome declassification of the 28 pages because it would "allow us to respond to any allegations in a clear and credible manner."

The pages were withheld from the 838-page report on the orders of President George W. Bush, who said the release could divulge intelligence sources and methods. Still, protecting U.S.-Saudi diplomatic relations also was believed to have been a factor.

Frankly, it's a mistake not to release the documents in their entirety.  There is already suspicion of a cover-up, and, barring the exposure of intelligence methods and assets, the whole story should be laid out for the families of 9/11 victims and the American people.

Judging by what was in the 9/11 Commission report on the Saudi connection, it's likely that accomplices with close ties to the Saudi monarchy are named.  Perhaps even minor royals are mentioned in the classified pages.  It may cause even more friction between the two countries, but the Saudis need us as much as we need them.  There shouldn't be a serious breach in our relationship.