New York primary a snoozer as conventional wisdom rules the day

The conventional wisdom going into the New York primary was that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton would dominate the proceedings.  For once in this wacky political season, conventional wisdom ruled.

Perhaps the only shockers in the contest was the margin of victory by both Trump and Clinton. New York seemed determined to show the love to both candidates, and the voters rewarded their favorite son and daughter with massive totals.

Trump won 60% of the vote ,with his nearest rival, John Kasich, picking up only 25%.  Ted Cruz sank to 15%, which should be a lesson to future conservative candidates: don't diss those "New York values."  The Donald picked up 89 of 92 avaiable delegates, improving his chances of hitting the magic 1,237 number before he hits the convention.  Trump's delegate count stands at 845, compared to 559 for Cruz. 

As for Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders outspent her 2-1 in the state, and he still got creamed 58-42%.  Due to the quirky delegate allocation rules, Sanders still recieved 106 delegates compared to Clinton's 173.  Since the Democrats have no winner-take-all primaries, Clinton should be able to slowly build her delegate count to the 2,382 needed for secure the nomination.  Currently, she stands at 1,911, nearly 700 delegates better than Sanders.

John Podhoretz:

It’s a glorious night for Trumpkins for the same reason it’s a sobering night for those of us who believe a Trump nomination would be disastrous for the party and the country.

For the first time in this race, Trump actually closed strongly and ended up significantly outperforming his poll average by about 7 points.

The next five contests over the next two weeks take place on fertile ground for Trump, and if his ability to gain ground persists, he is going to be aiming a dagger at the hearts of the so-called “#neverTrump” crowd.

Ted Cruz was never going to win New York or come remotely close. But he should have been able to do far better than a horrifying 15 percent.

John Kasich beat Cruz here. Now, Kasich may be a better fit for New York than the very conservative Texan — indeed, Kasich won in Manhattan — but that wouldn’t have happened if Cruz had come even remotely close to making the sale with Republicans who don’t want Trump to be the nominee.

And there are a lot of them here in New York.

Cruz is running a tight, disciplined campaign focused on maximizing his delegate count through mastery of the rules governing delegates at the state level. But he’s running a mediocre campaign when it comes to winning over masses of voters.

If he continues to lose to Trump with voters in state after state, as it appears he will from Connecticut to Maryland to Rhode Island to Pennsylvania, the melioristic notion many not-Trumpers have entertained that Cruz just needs to wait out the bad states until he can turn to more favorable terrain like Indiana and Nebraska and California may turn on them.

I'm not as pessimistic as Johnny Pods about Cruz's chances in Cleveland.  With so many working so hard to deny Trump the nomination, the #NeverTrump crowd may yet succeed in denying the prize to the frontrunner.

As Podhoretz notes, the upcoming primaries are in unfriendly territory for Ted Cruz, which is why Kasich will probably receive a boost from GOP donors looking to stop Trump.  But Kasich is not a viable candidate, and with most of the upcoming primaries on April 26 winner-take-all contests, he will be able to win few delegates.

This is the first day of the rest of the primary season.  The race has turned a corner and is heading for home.  Both Trump and Clinton enjoy large, nearly insurmountable leads, and all Cruz and Sanders can do is plot a coup at the convention.

The conventional wisdom going into the New York primary was that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton would dominate the proceedings.  For once in this wacky political season, conventional wisdom ruled.

Perhaps the only shockers in the contest was the margin of victory by both Trump and Clinton. New York seemed determined to show the love to both candidates, and the voters rewarded their favorite son and daughter with massive totals.

Trump won 60% of the vote ,with his nearest rival, John Kasich, picking up only 25%.  Ted Cruz sank to 15%, which should be a lesson to future conservative candidates: don't diss those "New York values."  The Donald picked up 89 of 92 avaiable delegates, improving his chances of hitting the magic 1,237 number before he hits the convention.  Trump's delegate count stands at 845, compared to 559 for Cruz. 

As for Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders outspent her 2-1 in the state, and he still got creamed 58-42%.  Due to the quirky delegate allocation rules, Sanders still recieved 106 delegates compared to Clinton's 173.  Since the Democrats have no winner-take-all primaries, Clinton should be able to slowly build her delegate count to the 2,382 needed for secure the nomination.  Currently, she stands at 1,911, nearly 700 delegates better than Sanders.

John Podhoretz:

It’s a glorious night for Trumpkins for the same reason it’s a sobering night for those of us who believe a Trump nomination would be disastrous for the party and the country.

For the first time in this race, Trump actually closed strongly and ended up significantly outperforming his poll average by about 7 points.

The next five contests over the next two weeks take place on fertile ground for Trump, and if his ability to gain ground persists, he is going to be aiming a dagger at the hearts of the so-called “#neverTrump” crowd.

Ted Cruz was never going to win New York or come remotely close. But he should have been able to do far better than a horrifying 15 percent.

John Kasich beat Cruz here. Now, Kasich may be a better fit for New York than the very conservative Texan — indeed, Kasich won in Manhattan — but that wouldn’t have happened if Cruz had come even remotely close to making the sale with Republicans who don’t want Trump to be the nominee.

And there are a lot of them here in New York.

Cruz is running a tight, disciplined campaign focused on maximizing his delegate count through mastery of the rules governing delegates at the state level. But he’s running a mediocre campaign when it comes to winning over masses of voters.

If he continues to lose to Trump with voters in state after state, as it appears he will from Connecticut to Maryland to Rhode Island to Pennsylvania, the melioristic notion many not-Trumpers have entertained that Cruz just needs to wait out the bad states until he can turn to more favorable terrain like Indiana and Nebraska and California may turn on them.

I'm not as pessimistic as Johnny Pods about Cruz's chances in Cleveland.  With so many working so hard to deny Trump the nomination, the #NeverTrump crowd may yet succeed in denying the prize to the frontrunner.

As Podhoretz notes, the upcoming primaries are in unfriendly territory for Ted Cruz, which is why Kasich will probably receive a boost from GOP donors looking to stop Trump.  But Kasich is not a viable candidate, and with most of the upcoming primaries on April 26 winner-take-all contests, he will be able to win few delegates.

This is the first day of the rest of the primary season.  The race has turned a corner and is heading for home.  Both Trump and Clinton enjoy large, nearly insurmountable leads, and all Cruz and Sanders can do is plot a coup at the convention.