Hillary loses by winning the tussle over a New York debate with Bernie Sanders

Hillary Clinton is showing signs of desperation in her bitter and extended tussle with the Bernie Sanders campaign over setting a time and place for a New York debate prior to the Empire State’s primary in two weeks. But in the end, Sanders agree to change his campaign schedule, and capitulated to Hillary’s suggested April 14th evening debate in Brooklyn – where her campaign is headquartered. In superficially capitulating, he won.

The victory for Hillary came at the price of looking very bad. Prior to the Sanders surrender:

“The Clinton campaign disingenuously announced that it had agreed to a debate on another day when it knew very well that Sen. Sanders already had locked in a park permit for a major rally in New York City,” Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs said in a statement Sunday night. “Let’s get serious. Let’s get on with debating the candidates’ stands on serious issues affecting New York and the United States.”

 But then, Hillary supporter and radical leftist mayor of New York City Bill deBlasio intervened:

But on Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is backing Clinton, appeared to tip the scales in her favor. “Let’s make NY1 4/14 BKLYN debate happen,” he tweeted and wrote to Sanders: “I'll help you secure any permit you need to ensure your NYC rally can happen too.”

Negotiations between the campaigns and the Democratic National Committee continued until minutes before the debate was announced, a source familiar with the discussions said. Sanders did not want the New York State Democratic Party to be a cosponsor of the debate, a source told POLITICO. The Sanders campaign, in general, has resisted the involvement of party organizations, which often back Clinton. The New York State Democratic Party will not be involved, said a source familiar with the negotiations, noting that the Sanders campaign would not have agreed to the date if they were included.

Both sides are not speaking publicly about the negotiations, a sign of deep bitterness.  And I wonder if Hillary appreciates deBlasio intervening as he did.  The Sanders campaign took the opportunity to score some big hits on Hillary, reinforcing the basic theme of the Sanders campaign:

[Sanders campaign spokesman Michael] Briggs says, "We are glad that she finally has agreed. Sanders all along has pressed for a debate on television in prime time so the greatest number of New Yorkers and Americans may listen to the candidates and decide for themselves who has the best ideas about how to reform our rigged economy and the corrupt campaign finance system. It's great for the people of New York that there will be a debate in Brooklyn, something that the Clinton campaign has long opposed."

Referring to the rally, which is now on April 13, Briggs added, "Fortunately, we were able to move a major New York City rally scheduled for April 14 to the night before. We hope the debate will be worth the inconvenience for thousands of New Yorkers who were planning to attend our rally on Thursday but will have to change their schedules to accommodate Secretary Clinton’s jam-packed, high-dollar, coast-to-coast schedule of fundraisers all over the country."

Expect Sanders to say something about Hillary’s fundraising schedule when the debate opens.

It is clear that Hillary wanted to avoid the debate, or if it happened, to keep viewership down – for instance by proposing to have the debate last night during the NCAA basketball championship. This was the playbook she used earlier in the campaign, doing Saturday night debates with Sanders in hopes few would watch. After all, as the front-runner and presumptive candidate, she has everything to lose and little to gain. Except that refusing to debate rally looks bad, and looking bad is pretty much what her campaign has been about lately.

Clinton’s delegate lead is so substantial that she is still expected by most knowledgeable analysts to win the nomination. But in the meantime, Sanders continues to score points portraying her as a rich tool of the powerful moneyed interests.

The truth hurts.

Hillary Clinton is showing signs of desperation in her bitter and extended tussle with the Bernie Sanders campaign over setting a time and place for a New York debate prior to the Empire State’s primary in two weeks. But in the end, Sanders agree to change his campaign schedule, and capitulated to Hillary’s suggested April 14th evening debate in Brooklyn – where her campaign is headquartered. In superficially capitulating, he won.

The victory for Hillary came at the price of looking very bad. Prior to the Sanders surrender:

“The Clinton campaign disingenuously announced that it had agreed to a debate on another day when it knew very well that Sen. Sanders already had locked in a park permit for a major rally in New York City,” Sanders spokesman Michael Briggs said in a statement Sunday night. “Let’s get serious. Let’s get on with debating the candidates’ stands on serious issues affecting New York and the United States.”

 But then, Hillary supporter and radical leftist mayor of New York City Bill deBlasio intervened:

But on Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is backing Clinton, appeared to tip the scales in her favor. “Let’s make NY1 4/14 BKLYN debate happen,” he tweeted and wrote to Sanders: “I'll help you secure any permit you need to ensure your NYC rally can happen too.”

Negotiations between the campaigns and the Democratic National Committee continued until minutes before the debate was announced, a source familiar with the discussions said. Sanders did not want the New York State Democratic Party to be a cosponsor of the debate, a source told POLITICO. The Sanders campaign, in general, has resisted the involvement of party organizations, which often back Clinton. The New York State Democratic Party will not be involved, said a source familiar with the negotiations, noting that the Sanders campaign would not have agreed to the date if they were included.

Both sides are not speaking publicly about the negotiations, a sign of deep bitterness.  And I wonder if Hillary appreciates deBlasio intervening as he did.  The Sanders campaign took the opportunity to score some big hits on Hillary, reinforcing the basic theme of the Sanders campaign:

[Sanders campaign spokesman Michael] Briggs says, "We are glad that she finally has agreed. Sanders all along has pressed for a debate on television in prime time so the greatest number of New Yorkers and Americans may listen to the candidates and decide for themselves who has the best ideas about how to reform our rigged economy and the corrupt campaign finance system. It's great for the people of New York that there will be a debate in Brooklyn, something that the Clinton campaign has long opposed."

Referring to the rally, which is now on April 13, Briggs added, "Fortunately, we were able to move a major New York City rally scheduled for April 14 to the night before. We hope the debate will be worth the inconvenience for thousands of New Yorkers who were planning to attend our rally on Thursday but will have to change their schedules to accommodate Secretary Clinton’s jam-packed, high-dollar, coast-to-coast schedule of fundraisers all over the country."

Expect Sanders to say something about Hillary’s fundraising schedule when the debate opens.

It is clear that Hillary wanted to avoid the debate, or if it happened, to keep viewership down – for instance by proposing to have the debate last night during the NCAA basketball championship. This was the playbook she used earlier in the campaign, doing Saturday night debates with Sanders in hopes few would watch. After all, as the front-runner and presumptive candidate, she has everything to lose and little to gain. Except that refusing to debate rally looks bad, and looking bad is pretty much what her campaign has been about lately.

Clinton’s delegate lead is so substantial that she is still expected by most knowledgeable analysts to win the nomination. But in the meantime, Sanders continues to score points portraying her as a rich tool of the powerful moneyed interests.

The truth hurts.