Black Lives Matter activist embarrassed in Baltimore mayoral primary

Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson entered the race for Baltimore mayor hoping to "challeng the status quo of Baltimore's politics." Instead, the activist praised by President Obama and Hillary Clinton finished in sixth place with 2.5% of the vote.

Baltimore Sun:

While we did not win tonight, what we did was very important, and I want you to be as proud of our work together as I am," Mckesson said. "We did something very special, and it sets the table for what else is possible.

Mckesson, who has a large online following on Twitter and has won praise from high-ranking officials such as President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, was the last of 13 Democrats to enter the mayor's race in February.

He said he targeted 30,000 Baltimore voters over the campaign's final 30 days. Mckesson spent Election Day visiting polling stations and attempting to win over supporters.

Margaret Stansbury, 29, of Midtown, cast her ballot for Mckesson at the Waxter Center. She said she had initial concerns about his level of experience, but he won her over.

"When I heard more about his experience, that did it for me," she said.

Likewise, Mark Longhurst, 39, of Midtown, said he voted for Mckesson because he wanted change in Baltimore.

"We need someone who can shake Baltimore up," he said.

McKesson appears to be trying to mainstream the BLM movement. This will be difficult given that all most of the activists do is scream incoherently. 

It also doesn't help that McKesson is a radical. Here's part of his platform:

"It’s a plan to change Baltimore, to make Baltimore a place that works for people," he said, announcing the plan on the video site, Periscope.  "The safety of our communities is not predicated upon the presence of police."

Mckesson, a Teach for America alumnus and former school administrator, rose to prominence during protests in Missouri after the police-involved shooting death of Michael Brown. His plan advocates taking money from the police department and redistributing it to other areas of government.

He wants to advocate for an end to the state's cash-bail system, require racial impact analyses of all new city laws before signing them, and reform the state-run rent court to prevent families from being unfairly evicted.

[...]

On policing, Mckesson's plan calls for banning arrest and citation quotas, ending civil asset forfeiture and ending choke-holds and “rough rides” by police. He also wants to redistribute a portion of the police budget to the community, bolster the Civilian Review Board and require a majority of Baltimore officers to be recruited from, and live in, the neighborhoods with the most police activity.

Spend less on police as crime is skyrocketing? That certainly is an innovative way to fight crime. Or make Baltimore a shooting gallery.

McKesson was even too liberal for Baltimore. But I have no doubt we haven't heard the end iof him. 

 

Black Lives Matter activist DeRay McKesson entered the race for Baltimore mayor hoping to "challeng the status quo of Baltimore's politics." Instead, the activist praised by President Obama and Hillary Clinton finished in sixth place with 2.5% of the vote.

Baltimore Sun:

While we did not win tonight, what we did was very important, and I want you to be as proud of our work together as I am," Mckesson said. "We did something very special, and it sets the table for what else is possible.

Mckesson, who has a large online following on Twitter and has won praise from high-ranking officials such as President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, was the last of 13 Democrats to enter the mayor's race in February.

He said he targeted 30,000 Baltimore voters over the campaign's final 30 days. Mckesson spent Election Day visiting polling stations and attempting to win over supporters.

Margaret Stansbury, 29, of Midtown, cast her ballot for Mckesson at the Waxter Center. She said she had initial concerns about his level of experience, but he won her over.

"When I heard more about his experience, that did it for me," she said.

Likewise, Mark Longhurst, 39, of Midtown, said he voted for Mckesson because he wanted change in Baltimore.

"We need someone who can shake Baltimore up," he said.

McKesson appears to be trying to mainstream the BLM movement. This will be difficult given that all most of the activists do is scream incoherently. 

It also doesn't help that McKesson is a radical. Here's part of his platform:

"It’s a plan to change Baltimore, to make Baltimore a place that works for people," he said, announcing the plan on the video site, Periscope.  "The safety of our communities is not predicated upon the presence of police."

Mckesson, a Teach for America alumnus and former school administrator, rose to prominence during protests in Missouri after the police-involved shooting death of Michael Brown. His plan advocates taking money from the police department and redistributing it to other areas of government.

He wants to advocate for an end to the state's cash-bail system, require racial impact analyses of all new city laws before signing them, and reform the state-run rent court to prevent families from being unfairly evicted.

[...]

On policing, Mckesson's plan calls for banning arrest and citation quotas, ending civil asset forfeiture and ending choke-holds and “rough rides” by police. He also wants to redistribute a portion of the police budget to the community, bolster the Civilian Review Board and require a majority of Baltimore officers to be recruited from, and live in, the neighborhoods with the most police activity.

Spend less on police as crime is skyrocketing? That certainly is an innovative way to fight crime. Or make Baltimore a shooting gallery.

McKesson was even too liberal for Baltimore. But I have no doubt we haven't heard the end iof him.