(Un-)Democratic Party leaders lean on Sanders to pipe down and leave Hillary alone

The powers that be in the Democratic Party have always realized that the spoils of office, not any principles, are what matter, and they’ve had quite enough of Bernie Sanders and his followers, who take their rhetoric seriously.  Now that Hillary Clinton seems to enjoy a commanding lead in delegates, Bern is feeling the burn.  Burgess Everett reports in Politico:

… nearly a dozen Democratic lawmakers suggested in interviews that Sanders should focus more on stopping Donald Trump and less on why he believes Clinton’s stands on trade, financial regulation and foreign policy would make her a flawed president. (snip)

The message senators are airing publicly mirrors what President Barack Obama told donors in private recently, according to The New York Times: That while Clinton may have her faults as a candidate, the party needs to channel its energy into defeating Trump.

Of course, since Sanders has never been a member of the party, they can’t exactly throw him out.  And there’s a real problem here, because Bernie is a true believer.  In fact, he is beginning to call the Democratic Party out on its undemocratic structure, which resembles the old oxymoronic communist doctrine of “democratic centralism” (i.e., shut up and obey because we represent your real interests, no matter what you may think to the contrary).  Speaking on Face the Nation yesterday (via The Hill):

"The whole concept of superdelegates is problematic," he said on CBS's "Face The Nation."

The Vermont senator said he thinks it would be a good idea for superdelegates to come over to his side in states where he has won by a significant margin.

"I think it might be a good idea for superdelegates to listen to the people in their own state," he said.

The superdelegates, office holders and party officials mainly, have their own futures to look out for and are unlikely to heed Bernie.

The big contingency here is what will develop with the FBI and NSA investigations into Hillary.  I am certain that the party does not want to turn to Sanders if Rodham Clinton is forced out of the race.  He actually believes their BS, and so he would be disaster for the spoils system that animates the party (as well as for the economy, but that’s a secondary concern at best).

I am certain that out of public earshot, some veiled – or maybe not so veiled – threats are ready to be deployed if Sanders persists.  There is a need to keep him from bolting the party, so some delicacy may be needed.  It will be amusing for the rest of us to watch.

The powers that be in the Democratic Party have always realized that the spoils of office, not any principles, are what matter, and they’ve had quite enough of Bernie Sanders and his followers, who take their rhetoric seriously.  Now that Hillary Clinton seems to enjoy a commanding lead in delegates, Bern is feeling the burn.  Burgess Everett reports in Politico:

… nearly a dozen Democratic lawmakers suggested in interviews that Sanders should focus more on stopping Donald Trump and less on why he believes Clinton’s stands on trade, financial regulation and foreign policy would make her a flawed president. (snip)

The message senators are airing publicly mirrors what President Barack Obama told donors in private recently, according to The New York Times: That while Clinton may have her faults as a candidate, the party needs to channel its energy into defeating Trump.

Of course, since Sanders has never been a member of the party, they can’t exactly throw him out.  And there’s a real problem here, because Bernie is a true believer.  In fact, he is beginning to call the Democratic Party out on its undemocratic structure, which resembles the old oxymoronic communist doctrine of “democratic centralism” (i.e., shut up and obey because we represent your real interests, no matter what you may think to the contrary).  Speaking on Face the Nation yesterday (via The Hill):

"The whole concept of superdelegates is problematic," he said on CBS's "Face The Nation."

The Vermont senator said he thinks it would be a good idea for superdelegates to come over to his side in states where he has won by a significant margin.

"I think it might be a good idea for superdelegates to listen to the people in their own state," he said.

The superdelegates, office holders and party officials mainly, have their own futures to look out for and are unlikely to heed Bernie.

The big contingency here is what will develop with the FBI and NSA investigations into Hillary.  I am certain that the party does not want to turn to Sanders if Rodham Clinton is forced out of the race.  He actually believes their BS, and so he would be disaster for the spoils system that animates the party (as well as for the economy, but that’s a secondary concern at best).

I am certain that out of public earshot, some veiled – or maybe not so veiled – threats are ready to be deployed if Sanders persists.  There is a need to keep him from bolting the party, so some delicacy may be needed.  It will be amusing for the rest of us to watch.