Trump threatens suit over loss of Louisiana delegates to Cruz

Donald Trump is threatening to sue the Cruz campaign over his being outmaneuvered in Louisiana in the allocation of delegates.

The Cruz campaign used the complicated rules set up to choose Louisiana delegates to garner as many as 10 additional delegates to the Cleveland convention that were awarded him after the primary.  They caught the Trump campaign flat-footed and unfamiliar with the delegate selection rules.

Daily Caller:

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz may turn out to be the real winner of the Louisiana Republican primary. Despite losing the primary in early March by fewer than four percentage points and winning an equal number of pledged delegates, Cruz supporters scooped up five of Louisiana’s six positions on key committees intended to write the Republican National Convention’s rules and platform, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Only one Trump supporter managed to receive an appointment to a senior level delegate post. Eric Skrmetta, the Trump campaign’s state co-chairman was named vice chairman of GOP convention delegation, a mainly ceremonial position without decision-making responsibilities.

It appears the Cruz camp’s strategy of winning over state delegates who will be major players at the convention is bearing fruit. Cruz may end up with up to 10 more delegates in Louisiana favorable towards him in his goal to reach 1,237 delegates before Trump does at a possible contested convention.

Trump's threatened suit is eliciting mockery from several sources:

"He should sue his own campaign for not knowing some of the basics of delegate rules," tweeted Dan Pffieffer, a former top political aide to President Obama.

Cruz staffers joined in later Sunday.

"Maybe your time is better spent reading rules than sending hate-tweets," tweeted Cruz national spokesman Ron Nerhing.

Oh cry me a river…we have earned our delegates fair & square, & our momentum grows…rightfully troubling to Trump," addedCatherine Frazier, Cruz's press secretary.

Trump's campaign had better get up to speed on the rules in other states as well, or the Cruz campaign will have similar success elsewhere:

In the state of Georgia, where Trump won decisively and was awarded 42 of the Peach State’s 76 delegates, has had a similar turn of events. One particular county, Coweta, heavily went Trump’s way by 12 percentage points, but Georgia Cruz campaign organizer Brant Frost told the WSJ that the senator’s supporters will compose 90 percent of Coweta’s delegates at state and district meetings. This group of delegates will be part of the larger pool of Georgia delegates that are chosen to go to Cleveland.

“A lot of Trump supporters are new,” Phoebe Hobbs, a Trump supporter at a GOP Convention in Cobb County, Ga. told the WSJ, noting they were unaware they needed be at Georgia precinct meetings one month ago.

“There’s a reason they are upset [with the political system],” said Hobbs. “They don’t know how the party is run.”

Louisiana Trump supporter Kay Kellogg Katz, a former state legislator who went to every Republican Convention since 1984, said the Cruz campaign played a better delegate strategy in the state. She lost her delegate position in a 22-5 vote to Kim Fralick, a Cruz supporter with no experience in a major political campaign.

So is this "fair"?  Everyone is given the rules before the vote even takes place, so there's absolutely no excuse for Trump's ignorance.  Whining about being oblivious to the most basic part of politics – the nuts and bolts, ins and outs of delegate selection – reflects poorly on Trump's ability to lead the country.

The suit is going nowhere, and Trump is in trouble unless he starts paying attention to the process.

Donald Trump is threatening to sue the Cruz campaign over his being outmaneuvered in Louisiana in the allocation of delegates.

The Cruz campaign used the complicated rules set up to choose Louisiana delegates to garner as many as 10 additional delegates to the Cleveland convention that were awarded him after the primary.  They caught the Trump campaign flat-footed and unfamiliar with the delegate selection rules.

Daily Caller:

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz may turn out to be the real winner of the Louisiana Republican primary. Despite losing the primary in early March by fewer than four percentage points and winning an equal number of pledged delegates, Cruz supporters scooped up five of Louisiana’s six positions on key committees intended to write the Republican National Convention’s rules and platform, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Only one Trump supporter managed to receive an appointment to a senior level delegate post. Eric Skrmetta, the Trump campaign’s state co-chairman was named vice chairman of GOP convention delegation, a mainly ceremonial position without decision-making responsibilities.

It appears the Cruz camp’s strategy of winning over state delegates who will be major players at the convention is bearing fruit. Cruz may end up with up to 10 more delegates in Louisiana favorable towards him in his goal to reach 1,237 delegates before Trump does at a possible contested convention.

Trump's threatened suit is eliciting mockery from several sources:

"He should sue his own campaign for not knowing some of the basics of delegate rules," tweeted Dan Pffieffer, a former top political aide to President Obama.

Cruz staffers joined in later Sunday.

"Maybe your time is better spent reading rules than sending hate-tweets," tweeted Cruz national spokesman Ron Nerhing.

Oh cry me a river…we have earned our delegates fair & square, & our momentum grows…rightfully troubling to Trump," addedCatherine Frazier, Cruz's press secretary.

Trump's campaign had better get up to speed on the rules in other states as well, or the Cruz campaign will have similar success elsewhere:

In the state of Georgia, where Trump won decisively and was awarded 42 of the Peach State’s 76 delegates, has had a similar turn of events. One particular county, Coweta, heavily went Trump’s way by 12 percentage points, but Georgia Cruz campaign organizer Brant Frost told the WSJ that the senator’s supporters will compose 90 percent of Coweta’s delegates at state and district meetings. This group of delegates will be part of the larger pool of Georgia delegates that are chosen to go to Cleveland.

“A lot of Trump supporters are new,” Phoebe Hobbs, a Trump supporter at a GOP Convention in Cobb County, Ga. told the WSJ, noting they were unaware they needed be at Georgia precinct meetings one month ago.

“There’s a reason they are upset [with the political system],” said Hobbs. “They don’t know how the party is run.”

Louisiana Trump supporter Kay Kellogg Katz, a former state legislator who went to every Republican Convention since 1984, said the Cruz campaign played a better delegate strategy in the state. She lost her delegate position in a 22-5 vote to Kim Fralick, a Cruz supporter with no experience in a major political campaign.

So is this "fair"?  Everyone is given the rules before the vote even takes place, so there's absolutely no excuse for Trump's ignorance.  Whining about being oblivious to the most basic part of politics – the nuts and bolts, ins and outs of delegate selection – reflects poorly on Trump's ability to lead the country.

The suit is going nowhere, and Trump is in trouble unless he starts paying attention to the process.