Time to sue the Trump rally disruptors and criminalize blocking highways

With the mainstream media continuing to blame Trump supporters for the efforts of their opponents to shut down their free speech rights, it may be time to adopt the tactics the left favors to get its way: lawsuits.  That’s the suggestion of John Banzhaf, a George Washington University law professor who defies categorization politically but is often labeled a “gadfly. ”  He explains:

 

With the mainstream media continuing to blame Trump supporters for the efforts of their opponents to shut down their free speech rights, it may be time to adopt the tactics the left favors to get its way: lawsuits.  That’s the suggestion of John Banzhaf, a George Washington University law professor who defies categorization politically but is often labeled a “gadfly. ”  He explains:

 

Law professor Glenn Reynolds of Instapundit elaborates:

Silly man. It’s different when you sue Republicans. More seriously, though, there is a lot of coordination among people and groups with sufficient assets to be worth suing here. And the discovery would be delicious.

If Soros, who backs MoveOn, an organization that has urged shutdowns, could be held liable, Trump might get even richer.

Meanwhile, Jazz Shaw of Hot Air suggests criminaization of protests that block highways:

 Intentionally shutting down a highway – particularly one which serves as an effective choke point to an entire community – is not a “protest.” It’s a violation of the law which serves no interest in terms of free speech or messaging. Minnesota recently introduced legislation which would make the authors of such disruption pay for the extra costs imposed on the local community. Arizona and the rest of the states should look into similar remedies since this is quickly turning into the new normal. The Sheriff could (and should) have arrested everyone blocking that road, gotten all of their information and ensured that they were held responsible for the costs in addition to spending a bit of time behind bars to remind them of the serious consequences of their actions. As long as we keep treating this sort of criminal behavior as acceptable, normal demonstrations of free speech we will only embolden more scofflaws considering similar dangerous actions.