The Blatant Cultural Appropriation on St. Patrick’s Day Is Not Cool

Satire alert: This is a slightly modified version of a Huffington Post article from March 3 on Indian culture of the Asian variety. Changes are italicized.

In another blatant example of cultural appropriation, thousands of years of rich history and heritage are reduced to a party theme for drunken people's amusement and consumption.

And why not have any people of actual Irish descent present to showcase what is their own instead of a cheap and poorly executed imitation by people who have no connection to Ireland whatsoever?

Non-Irish people, especially those in New York, want so badly to wear our culture as a costume because it's pretty, but they never want to carry all that it means to be Irish in the western context -- in which we are constantly reminded we don't belong -- No Irish Need Apply.

Once again, non-Irish in positions of power will do what they want to do without any consideration for marginalized groups. Their talk of supporting gingers is just meaningless chatter when they prove to be false allies. Solidarity is a myth.

I can't believe no one stopped to think "Hmmm, this might be a bad idea." How low is the bar set? Pretty low, it seems. People are not even trying to hide their microaggressive behavior and outright Mc’Ophobia.

They'll just do it and fuss when they get called out as if they're the real victims. I am just tired of it all. Tired, and demanding change. And I don't even want to hear the "paying homage/showing appreciation" excuse because of how blatantly inaccurate so much of it was.

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade is laughable and stupid; I don't even know how many WTFs left my mouth while watching. It made me uncomfortable and disappointed, and honestly, unless your culture has been exploited like mine has been countless times, you don't know how it feels to see this happen time and again without ever witnessing steps in the right direction.

The Cashills came to America during the Irish potato famine. And if the St. Patrick’s Day parade is the highest price he has to pay for his residence here, Jack is happy to pay it -- just as long as no would-be leprechaun vomits on his car.

Satire alert: This is a slightly modified version of a Huffington Post article from March 3 on Indian culture of the Asian variety. Changes are italicized.

In another blatant example of cultural appropriation, thousands of years of rich history and heritage are reduced to a party theme for drunken people's amusement and consumption.

And why not have any people of actual Irish descent present to showcase what is their own instead of a cheap and poorly executed imitation by people who have no connection to Ireland whatsoever?

Non-Irish people, especially those in New York, want so badly to wear our culture as a costume because it's pretty, but they never want to carry all that it means to be Irish in the western context -- in which we are constantly reminded we don't belong -- No Irish Need Apply.

Once again, non-Irish in positions of power will do what they want to do without any consideration for marginalized groups. Their talk of supporting gingers is just meaningless chatter when they prove to be false allies. Solidarity is a myth.

I can't believe no one stopped to think "Hmmm, this might be a bad idea." How low is the bar set? Pretty low, it seems. People are not even trying to hide their microaggressive behavior and outright Mc’Ophobia.

They'll just do it and fuss when they get called out as if they're the real victims. I am just tired of it all. Tired, and demanding change. And I don't even want to hear the "paying homage/showing appreciation" excuse because of how blatantly inaccurate so much of it was.

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade is laughable and stupid; I don't even know how many WTFs left my mouth while watching. It made me uncomfortable and disappointed, and honestly, unless your culture has been exploited like mine has been countless times, you don't know how it feels to see this happen time and again without ever witnessing steps in the right direction.

The Cashills came to America during the Irish potato famine. And if the St. Patrick’s Day parade is the highest price he has to pay for his residence here, Jack is happy to pay it -- just as long as no would-be leprechaun vomits on his car.