A possible solution for a divided Republican Party

On Super Tuesday II, Donald Trump was victorious, except for Ohio.  To listen to the professional pundits on Fox, one would get the impression that Trump had a mediocre evening.  One cannot miss the negative information related to Trump's foreign policy experience and lack of national political acumen as seen regularly on Megyn Kelly's show and from the many political advisers from past Republican campaigns.  Meanwhile, Hannity has tried on his show to present a more even view of the damage being done by these pundits and insiders. 

The unschooled Trump has outlasted many professional politicians from the original 17 candidates.  One can conclude that despite his lack of experience, he is capable of learning how to navigate the political landmines.  He is unpredictable and difficult to analyze, making him a more formidable candidate opposing the corrupt insiders, while Hillary Clinton cannot disown her experience.

Many have decided to look toward others to stop Trump from gaining the nomination, as they are embarrassed or horrified by his tactics.  The establishment had hoped to see Jeb Bush as the nominee.  Then they turned toward Rubio, and now they may well pursue Kasich.  The conservative wing of the party, hardly the establishment, hopes that Ted Cruz can emerge with enough delegates.  These people have deluded themselves into thinking that Cruz is a likeable candidate when only one senator has endorsed him to date.

So what to do to keep the party from breaking apart?  It is time to look back in history for a possible solution.

William Howard Taft was elected president in 1908 as the selected heir to Teddy Roosevelt.  However, in 1912, Roosevelt determined that he could no longer support Taft and formed the Bull Moose Party to deny Taft re-election.  As a result, Woodrow Wilson was elected.  Thus began one of the foremost progressive periods, which moved the nation from its Constitutional roots.  Taft was not suited for the active political world, but he was more comfortable as the chief justice of the Supreme Court.

Yesterday, President Obama nominated Merrick Garland to replace Justice Scalia.  While Garland is more moderate than Obama's other nominees, he is clearly left of Scalia.  His nomination is not likely to proceed due to the effect his vote would have on the make-up of the Court.  However, it is hard to find someone of Scalia's temperament and philosophical views.

This situation presents an interesting and satisfying solution to the open seat on the Court and the bruising battle that might arise in Cleveland.  Cruz has an excellent legal mind, though does not appear suited for the Senate.  He may not be the ideal person for the White House either. 

Cruz has indicated that he would oppose a brokered convention orchestrated by the party bosses.  He also has indicated that only two persons have a mathematical path to the nomination.  Cruz would consider a contested convention, but this would depend upon the negotiating skills of Trump and Cruz during the six weeks between the final primary and the convention in Cleveland.

Trump has business skills and is a born leader.  His rhetoric is inflammatory and problematic.  However, his lead in the delegate hunt is significant.  Cruz's march toward 1,237 delegates is more difficult than the one Trump must take.  Perhaps no one will amass the necessary delegates before the convention.  Though roughly half of the Republican electorate has not voted yet, it is time to limit the attacks to allow a unified party to emerge and defeat Hillary in November.

To this end, I propose that Trump declare that he would appoint Ted Cruz to the Supreme Court, where Cruz can affect legal policy for two generations and protect the Scalia seat.  Then he should offer someone like Kasich the vice presidency to ensure that Ohio goes Republican and deny Hillary the opportunity to name justices. 

Should Trump lose the election against Hillary, then the nominee provided by Obama could be considered in the lame duck session to minimize the damage a Clinton nominee could do.  Many of the other Republican primary candidates could form members of the cabinet, which would help to heal the divide.

The anti-Trump forces have already thrown most of the potential Trump mud before the general election.  He has weathered these attacks already.  There is plenty to throw in Hillary's direction.

The Democratic Party is hardly united.  The passion at Bernie Sanders's events contrasts the Hillary events.  Trump brings the same kind of passion to the table, though raw in its form.  Trump is a moderate to conservative populist, in contrast to the liberal to socialist Sanders.  Trump lacks some of the civility the political class understands, but he plainly states the public concerns.  The real enemy is not Trump, but Clinton.  We need to realign the body politic by expanding the Republican Party and reducing the one hundred years march toward socialism.

On Super Tuesday II, Donald Trump was victorious, except for Ohio.  To listen to the professional pundits on Fox, one would get the impression that Trump had a mediocre evening.  One cannot miss the negative information related to Trump's foreign policy experience and lack of national political acumen as seen regularly on Megyn Kelly's show and from the many political advisers from past Republican campaigns.  Meanwhile, Hannity has tried on his show to present a more even view of the damage being done by these pundits and insiders. 

The unschooled Trump has outlasted many professional politicians from the original 17 candidates.  One can conclude that despite his lack of experience, he is capable of learning how to navigate the political landmines.  He is unpredictable and difficult to analyze, making him a more formidable candidate opposing the corrupt insiders, while Hillary Clinton cannot disown her experience.

Many have decided to look toward others to stop Trump from gaining the nomination, as they are embarrassed or horrified by his tactics.  The establishment had hoped to see Jeb Bush as the nominee.  Then they turned toward Rubio, and now they may well pursue Kasich.  The conservative wing of the party, hardly the establishment, hopes that Ted Cruz can emerge with enough delegates.  These people have deluded themselves into thinking that Cruz is a likeable candidate when only one senator has endorsed him to date.

So what to do to keep the party from breaking apart?  It is time to look back in history for a possible solution.

William Howard Taft was elected president in 1908 as the selected heir to Teddy Roosevelt.  However, in 1912, Roosevelt determined that he could no longer support Taft and formed the Bull Moose Party to deny Taft re-election.  As a result, Woodrow Wilson was elected.  Thus began one of the foremost progressive periods, which moved the nation from its Constitutional roots.  Taft was not suited for the active political world, but he was more comfortable as the chief justice of the Supreme Court.

Yesterday, President Obama nominated Merrick Garland to replace Justice Scalia.  While Garland is more moderate than Obama's other nominees, he is clearly left of Scalia.  His nomination is not likely to proceed due to the effect his vote would have on the make-up of the Court.  However, it is hard to find someone of Scalia's temperament and philosophical views.

This situation presents an interesting and satisfying solution to the open seat on the Court and the bruising battle that might arise in Cleveland.  Cruz has an excellent legal mind, though does not appear suited for the Senate.  He may not be the ideal person for the White House either. 

Cruz has indicated that he would oppose a brokered convention orchestrated by the party bosses.  He also has indicated that only two persons have a mathematical path to the nomination.  Cruz would consider a contested convention, but this would depend upon the negotiating skills of Trump and Cruz during the six weeks between the final primary and the convention in Cleveland.

Trump has business skills and is a born leader.  His rhetoric is inflammatory and problematic.  However, his lead in the delegate hunt is significant.  Cruz's march toward 1,237 delegates is more difficult than the one Trump must take.  Perhaps no one will amass the necessary delegates before the convention.  Though roughly half of the Republican electorate has not voted yet, it is time to limit the attacks to allow a unified party to emerge and defeat Hillary in November.

To this end, I propose that Trump declare that he would appoint Ted Cruz to the Supreme Court, where Cruz can affect legal policy for two generations and protect the Scalia seat.  Then he should offer someone like Kasich the vice presidency to ensure that Ohio goes Republican and deny Hillary the opportunity to name justices. 

Should Trump lose the election against Hillary, then the nominee provided by Obama could be considered in the lame duck session to minimize the damage a Clinton nominee could do.  Many of the other Republican primary candidates could form members of the cabinet, which would help to heal the divide.

The anti-Trump forces have already thrown most of the potential Trump mud before the general election.  He has weathered these attacks already.  There is plenty to throw in Hillary's direction.

The Democratic Party is hardly united.  The passion at Bernie Sanders's events contrasts the Hillary events.  Trump brings the same kind of passion to the table, though raw in its form.  Trump is a moderate to conservative populist, in contrast to the liberal to socialist Sanders.  Trump lacks some of the civility the political class understands, but he plainly states the public concerns.  The real enemy is not Trump, but Clinton.  We need to realign the body politic by expanding the Republican Party and reducing the one hundred years march toward socialism.