Minnesota school drops celebration of Valentine's Day, other 'dominant' holidays

An elementary school in Minnesota will no longer celebrate Valentine's Day and other traditional American holidays because the mostly foreign-born student body might not feel "included" in the festivities.

Washington Times:

Principal Scott Masini of Bruce Vento Elementary School, whose student body is overwhelmingly nonwhite, explained in a letter to parents that he is ending the school’s celebration of dominant holidays until “we can come to a better understanding of how the dominant view will suppress someone else’s view,” the Star Tribune reported.

“One of the concerns that I have,” Mr. Masini wrote, “… is whether or not this practice is encroaching on the educational opportunities of others and threatening the culture of tolerance and respect for all.”

He concluded that the school needed to find a way to celebrate holidays that’s “inclusive of our student population.”

The ban includes Valentine’s Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Mr. Masini acknowledged that the decision might be unpopular for some and said school administrators would be happy to discuss the decision with concerned parents, the Star Tribune reported.

“Because Saint Paul Public Schools is a diverse district that is filled with families from around the world we strive to respect all cultures and all students,” a statement from St. Paul schools said Thursday. “We recognize that not every student celebrates or participates in some or all holidays. We have a board policy that discourages programs and festivities that celebrate observances unless they are required by law.”

Bruce Vento school is 52.3 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 35.4 percent black, 6.9 percent Hispanic, 4.3 percent white and 1 percent American Indian/Alaskan Native, the Star Tribune reported.

There's a solution to this dilemma: allow students to celebrate the traditional holidays from their home country while acknowledging they now live in America by learning about and celebrating traditional American holidays.

That's the "melting pot" theory of assimilation that worked brilliantly for about 200 years.  It has now been completely abandoned in favor of multiculturalism that pushes the notion that it's more important for immigrants to maintain their cultural identification than assimilating into American ways.  It has been augmented by theories of diversity and inclusion that demonize American traditions while allowing immigrants to develop over-sensitivity to anything that isn't part of their cultural heritage.

American holidays are "dominant" because the immigrants live in America.  The stupidity of insisting otherwise only holds the new arrivals back, hurting their chances to make a better life for themselves and their children.  If that point isn't plain enough for the principal and the school board, they should be forced to attend a remedial American history course.

An elementary school in Minnesota will no longer celebrate Valentine's Day and other traditional American holidays because the mostly foreign-born student body might not feel "included" in the festivities.

Washington Times:

Principal Scott Masini of Bruce Vento Elementary School, whose student body is overwhelmingly nonwhite, explained in a letter to parents that he is ending the school’s celebration of dominant holidays until “we can come to a better understanding of how the dominant view will suppress someone else’s view,” the Star Tribune reported.

“One of the concerns that I have,” Mr. Masini wrote, “… is whether or not this practice is encroaching on the educational opportunities of others and threatening the culture of tolerance and respect for all.”

He concluded that the school needed to find a way to celebrate holidays that’s “inclusive of our student population.”

The ban includes Valentine’s Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Mr. Masini acknowledged that the decision might be unpopular for some and said school administrators would be happy to discuss the decision with concerned parents, the Star Tribune reported.

“Because Saint Paul Public Schools is a diverse district that is filled with families from around the world we strive to respect all cultures and all students,” a statement from St. Paul schools said Thursday. “We recognize that not every student celebrates or participates in some or all holidays. We have a board policy that discourages programs and festivities that celebrate observances unless they are required by law.”

Bruce Vento school is 52.3 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 35.4 percent black, 6.9 percent Hispanic, 4.3 percent white and 1 percent American Indian/Alaskan Native, the Star Tribune reported.

There's a solution to this dilemma: allow students to celebrate the traditional holidays from their home country while acknowledging they now live in America by learning about and celebrating traditional American holidays.

That's the "melting pot" theory of assimilation that worked brilliantly for about 200 years.  It has now been completely abandoned in favor of multiculturalism that pushes the notion that it's more important for immigrants to maintain their cultural identification than assimilating into American ways.  It has been augmented by theories of diversity and inclusion that demonize American traditions while allowing immigrants to develop over-sensitivity to anything that isn't part of their cultural heritage.

American holidays are "dominant" because the immigrants live in America.  The stupidity of insisting otherwise only holds the new arrivals back, hurting their chances to make a better life for themselves and their children.  If that point isn't plain enough for the principal and the school board, they should be forced to attend a remedial American history course.