Iowa caucus audit finds errors in 5 of 14 precincts checked; Hillary’s margin shrinks

“Hillary’s slim Iowa victory gets even slimmer,” headlines The Examiner.  In a story by Daniel Chaitin, it reports that a case-by-case audit has revealed that over a third of the 14 precincts checked found errors and that the net effect was to reduce Hillary’s lead even further:

Following a review of the fourteen precincts question on a case-by-case basis, reporting errors were found in five precincts, the state party announced Sunday.

The updated count shows a slight uptick in support for Sanders. The Vermont senator gained .105 state delegate equivalents. Clinton lost .122 state delegate equivalents.

With the recounts, Sanders finished at 49.59 percent with 696.92 state delegate equivalents. Clinton hung on to her lead at 49.84 percent with 700.47 state delegate equivalents.

One quarter of one percent separates the two, but Clinton can still claim “victory” and avoids the humiliation of starting her campaign with two losses to Bernie Sanders, as his polling lead in New Hampshire is substantial.

It is unclear to me if the 14 precincts were chosen on the basis of suspicions being raised or if this was some sort of random audit.  There are 1,681 precincts in the 99 counties of Iowa, so only 0.832838% have been audited.

“Hillary’s slim Iowa victory gets even slimmer,” headlines The Examiner.  In a story by Daniel Chaitin, it reports that a case-by-case audit has revealed that over a third of the 14 precincts checked found errors and that the net effect was to reduce Hillary’s lead even further:

Following a review of the fourteen precincts question on a case-by-case basis, reporting errors were found in five precincts, the state party announced Sunday.

The updated count shows a slight uptick in support for Sanders. The Vermont senator gained .105 state delegate equivalents. Clinton lost .122 state delegate equivalents.

With the recounts, Sanders finished at 49.59 percent with 696.92 state delegate equivalents. Clinton hung on to her lead at 49.84 percent with 700.47 state delegate equivalents.

One quarter of one percent separates the two, but Clinton can still claim “victory” and avoids the humiliation of starting her campaign with two losses to Bernie Sanders, as his polling lead in New Hampshire is substantial.

It is unclear to me if the 14 precincts were chosen on the basis of suspicions being raised or if this was some sort of random audit.  There are 1,681 precincts in the 99 counties of Iowa, so only 0.832838% have been audited.