Illinois Board of Elections declares Ted Cruz a ‘natural born citizen’

Ted Cruz, who has been an American citizen since birth – he was not naturalized – has been declared a “natural born citizen” by the Illinois Board of Elections, responding to a challenge.  Cristian Farias of the Huffington Post reports:

On the same day he won the Republican Iowa caucus, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas got a favorable decision from the Illinois Board of Elections, which ruled that he met the citizenship criteria to appear on the state's primary ballot.

Two objectors, Lawrence Joyce and William Graham, had challenged Cruz's presidential bid with the board, contending that his name should not appear on the March 15 ballot because his candidacy did not comply with Article II of the Constitution.

Adopting the recommendations of a hearing officer who considered the matter last week, the board of elections on Monday rejected both objections, ruled Cruz eligible and ordered that his name be certified for the election.

"The Candidate is a natural born citizen by virtue of being born in Canada to his mother who was a U.S. citizen at the time of his birth," the board said, reasoning that Cruz met the criteria because he "did not have to take any steps or go through a naturalization process at some point after birth." (snip)

Agenda minutes for the Illinois Board of Elections -- which include its determinations in the two challenges to Cruz's eligibility plus a separate one Graham filed against Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) -- can be found here.

It is not uncommon for U.S. Service personnel stationed overseas to marry locals and have children.  Are those children, including those not born at a base hospital (not everyone stationed overseas has access to a base hospital), ineligible for the presidency and not “natural born citizens” simply because their fathers or mothers were serving our country?

Ted Cruz, who has been an American citizen since birth – he was not naturalized – has been declared a “natural born citizen” by the Illinois Board of Elections, responding to a challenge.  Cristian Farias of the Huffington Post reports:

On the same day he won the Republican Iowa caucus, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas got a favorable decision from the Illinois Board of Elections, which ruled that he met the citizenship criteria to appear on the state's primary ballot.

Two objectors, Lawrence Joyce and William Graham, had challenged Cruz's presidential bid with the board, contending that his name should not appear on the March 15 ballot because his candidacy did not comply with Article II of the Constitution.

Adopting the recommendations of a hearing officer who considered the matter last week, the board of elections on Monday rejected both objections, ruled Cruz eligible and ordered that his name be certified for the election.

"The Candidate is a natural born citizen by virtue of being born in Canada to his mother who was a U.S. citizen at the time of his birth," the board said, reasoning that Cruz met the criteria because he "did not have to take any steps or go through a naturalization process at some point after birth." (snip)

Agenda minutes for the Illinois Board of Elections -- which include its determinations in the two challenges to Cruz's eligibility plus a separate one Graham filed against Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) -- can be found here.

It is not uncommon for U.S. Service personnel stationed overseas to marry locals and have children.  Are those children, including those not born at a base hospital (not everyone stationed overseas has access to a base hospital), ineligible for the presidency and not “natural born citizens” simply because their fathers or mothers were serving our country?