The Wounded Warrior Project seen from the trenches

The Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) has been under fire for transitioning from being a service organization to a wealthy, self-serving fundraising organization.

Retired Army Staff Sgt. Erick Millette came home from Iraq in 2006 with a Bronze star and a Purple Heart -- along with a traumatic brain injury and PTSD.

Wounded Warrior Project enrolled him in its program Warriors Speak, which "provides important life skills that help warriors succeed." In 2013, the charity hired him as a public speaker.

But Millette quit last year. He told CBS News correspondent Chip Reid that Warriors Speak is less like a program to help veterans and more like a fundraising vehicle.

"They will tell you it's not. But it is," Millette said. "I began to see how an organization that rakes in hundreds of millions of dollars a year is not helping my brothers and my sisters. Or at least not all of them."

It is important to have a nimble referral service for mental health treatment for our veterans.  I have no knowledge about the Wounded Warrior Project corporate structure, but I have accepted referrals from sources at WWP who have been knowledgeable and caring.  For example, a WWP referral from a different state facilitated mental health services for a wounded veteran who lived in a nearby rural county with very limited mental health care.  WWP unobtrusively monitored the services while keeping a concerned eye on the vet.  Without the WWP, this veteran probably would not have gotten needed help.

The WWP is committing $100 million to a warrior mental health care network in a partnership with four hospitals nationwide.  Much of the $100 million will go to hospital and program administration.  This is concerning.  Outpatient mental health services do not need the umbrella of a hospital setting or national administrative structure.  On the contrary, outpatient mental health services do better without organizational "partners."

The reason I was able to be helpful to the wounded warrior mentioned above is because there was no overbearing structure.  I got a call, there was a laudable absence of paperwork, and within a week the warrior was in my office.  The vet appreciated the simplicity and confidentiality of a private setting, which would most likely be lost in a "nationwide hospital partnership."  That $100 million would go much farther without that administrative overhead.

The Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) has been under fire for transitioning from being a service organization to a wealthy, self-serving fundraising organization.

Retired Army Staff Sgt. Erick Millette came home from Iraq in 2006 with a Bronze star and a Purple Heart -- along with a traumatic brain injury and PTSD.

Wounded Warrior Project enrolled him in its program Warriors Speak, which "provides important life skills that help warriors succeed." In 2013, the charity hired him as a public speaker.

But Millette quit last year. He told CBS News correspondent Chip Reid that Warriors Speak is less like a program to help veterans and more like a fundraising vehicle.

"They will tell you it's not. But it is," Millette said. "I began to see how an organization that rakes in hundreds of millions of dollars a year is not helping my brothers and my sisters. Or at least not all of them."

It is important to have a nimble referral service for mental health treatment for our veterans.  I have no knowledge about the Wounded Warrior Project corporate structure, but I have accepted referrals from sources at WWP who have been knowledgeable and caring.  For example, a WWP referral from a different state facilitated mental health services for a wounded veteran who lived in a nearby rural county with very limited mental health care.  WWP unobtrusively monitored the services while keeping a concerned eye on the vet.  Without the WWP, this veteran probably would not have gotten needed help.

The WWP is committing $100 million to a warrior mental health care network in a partnership with four hospitals nationwide.  Much of the $100 million will go to hospital and program administration.  This is concerning.  Outpatient mental health services do not need the umbrella of a hospital setting or national administrative structure.  On the contrary, outpatient mental health services do better without organizational "partners."

The reason I was able to be helpful to the wounded warrior mentioned above is because there was no overbearing structure.  I got a call, there was a laudable absence of paperwork, and within a week the warrior was in my office.  The vet appreciated the simplicity and confidentiality of a private setting, which would most likely be lost in a "nationwide hospital partnership."  That $100 million would go much farther without that administrative overhead.