If elected president, Marco Rubio promises to carry out God's plan

Marco Rubio is running an ad where he states that his goal is eternity, the ability to live alongside his creator and the gift of salvation offered by Jesus Christ.  Rubio adds that he wants to cooperate with God's plan.  He further states:

To those whom much has been given, much is expected. Whether your treasure is stored on Earth or in Heaven. I try to allow that to influence me in everything I do.

 

Basically, he is saying that people should vote for him because he is a devout Christian.  His message, while not quite as hollow as Carly Fiorina's giant cross she was sporting at the last debate, was still missing something important.

People are looking to elect a president.  But Rubio's ad sounds like he's running for a minister.  There is a way for a person of faith to talk about it in a way that is relevant to voters.  The way to do it is to talk about the intersection of faith and government power and individual rights and public policy.  That isn't what Rubio did.

Here's a better way of connecting the dots, as Ted Cruz did:

At his religious liberty-themed rally in Des Moines on Friday night, Cruz cast himself as the only choice for evangelical voters. There is a "war on faith," he said, as he quoted scripture and paced the stage like a televangelist; evangelical voters will "stay home no longer."

In the Iowa ballroom that night, Cruz interviewed Dick and Betty Odgaard, an Iowa Mennonite couple who became icons in the religious liberty movement after they refused to hold a same-sex wedding at their events space, which has since closed; he held Betty Odgaard's hand as she cried and recounted how the couple felt they could not hold a same-sex marriage because it violated their religious beliefs. The couple was sued and later closed their business. 

And he recounted his legal experience winning religious liberty cases, such as his fight as Texas solicitor general to keep a Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the state capitol, decided by a 5-4 Supreme Court margin. The high court, he argued, is one justice away from taking down all images of God.

"Is the next victim of persecution your pastor?" Cruz asked the crowd. "Your charity, where you volunteer your time at a crisis pregnancy center?"

Rubio just talked about his faith in the abstract.  It would have been better for him to use that to connect it to issues evangelical voters care about.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

Marco Rubio is running an ad where he states that his goal is eternity, the ability to live alongside his creator and the gift of salvation offered by Jesus Christ.  Rubio adds that he wants to cooperate with God's plan.  He further states:

To those whom much has been given, much is expected. Whether your treasure is stored on Earth or in Heaven. I try to allow that to influence me in everything I do.

 

Basically, he is saying that people should vote for him because he is a devout Christian.  His message, while not quite as hollow as Carly Fiorina's giant cross she was sporting at the last debate, was still missing something important.

People are looking to elect a president.  But Rubio's ad sounds like he's running for a minister.  There is a way for a person of faith to talk about it in a way that is relevant to voters.  The way to do it is to talk about the intersection of faith and government power and individual rights and public policy.  That isn't what Rubio did.

Here's a better way of connecting the dots, as Ted Cruz did:

At his religious liberty-themed rally in Des Moines on Friday night, Cruz cast himself as the only choice for evangelical voters. There is a "war on faith," he said, as he quoted scripture and paced the stage like a televangelist; evangelical voters will "stay home no longer."

In the Iowa ballroom that night, Cruz interviewed Dick and Betty Odgaard, an Iowa Mennonite couple who became icons in the religious liberty movement after they refused to hold a same-sex wedding at their events space, which has since closed; he held Betty Odgaard's hand as she cried and recounted how the couple felt they could not hold a same-sex marriage because it violated their religious beliefs. The couple was sued and later closed their business. 

And he recounted his legal experience winning religious liberty cases, such as his fight as Texas solicitor general to keep a Ten Commandments monument on the grounds of the state capitol, decided by a 5-4 Supreme Court margin. The high court, he argued, is one justice away from taking down all images of God.

"Is the next victim of persecution your pastor?" Cruz asked the crowd. "Your charity, where you volunteer your time at a crisis pregnancy center?"

Rubio just talked about his faith in the abstract.  It would have been better for him to use that to connect it to issues evangelical voters care about.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.