Hillary emails ‘too damaging to release’

It is always risky to predict doom for the Clintons, given their ability to make evidence disappear, make people forget, and (at least for Bill a couple of decades ago) obtain forgiveness from crimes like lying under oath.  But times have changed, Hillary is not charming the way Bill was before the ravages of age, and the issue is not illicit sex, perjury, or anything at all trivial; it is national security.  And by the latest developments, it is now clear to anyone but a rabid partisan that Hillary has endangered national security.

As most readers by now know, in the latest court-ordered release of Hillary’s emails, 22 emails in 7 chains have been completely withheld, as Fox News’s Catherine Herridge first reported yesterday:

The intelligence community has deemed some of Hillary Clinton’s emails “too damaging" to national security to release under any circumstances, according to a U.S. government official close to the ongoing review. A second source, who was not authorized to speak on the record, backed up the finding.  

The determination was first reported by Fox News, hours before the State Department formally announced Friday that seven email chains, found in 22 documents, will be withheld “in full” because they, in fact, contain “Top Secret” information.

The State Department, when first contacted by Fox News about withholding such emails Friday morning, did not dispute the reporting – but did not comment in detail. After a version of this report was first published, the Obama administration confirmed to the Associated Press that the seven email chains would be withheld. The department has since confirmed those details publicly.

The decision to withhold the documents in full, and not provide even a partial release with redactions, further undercuts claims by the State Department and the Clinton campaign that none of the intelligence in the emails was classified when it hit Clinton's personal server.

Fox News is told the emails include intelligence from "special access programs," or SAP, which is considered beyond “Top Secret.”

Those Secret Service guards around her Chappaqua house that Hillary pointed to as securing her server were powerless to prevent even middle-grade hacking, much less the efforts of powers like China; Russia; or, for example, Albania or Ecuador, from reading her emails.  Such as:

Fox News reported Friday that at least one Clinton email contained information identified as "HCS-O," which is the code for intelligence from human spying. 

It is in the nature of such secrets that we probably never will learn if people died as the result of Hillary’s security lapse.  She has reverted to claiming that it was a matter of “convenience” to use the home-brew server, meaning, apparently, that she is back to claiming she wanted to carry only one device, a BlackBerry, when in fact it is known that she had at least two.

The obvious explanation is that she wanted to control who could see the content of her emails, which by law would be subject to the Freedom of Information Act if they were on the secure State Department email systems.  “Convenience” in this case could mean staying out of jail.

That may not work.

It is always risky to predict doom for the Clintons, given their ability to make evidence disappear, make people forget, and (at least for Bill a couple of decades ago) obtain forgiveness from crimes like lying under oath.  But times have changed, Hillary is not charming the way Bill was before the ravages of age, and the issue is not illicit sex, perjury, or anything at all trivial; it is national security.  And by the latest developments, it is now clear to anyone but a rabid partisan that Hillary has endangered national security.

As most readers by now know, in the latest court-ordered release of Hillary’s emails, 22 emails in 7 chains have been completely withheld, as Fox News’s Catherine Herridge first reported yesterday:

The intelligence community has deemed some of Hillary Clinton’s emails “too damaging" to national security to release under any circumstances, according to a U.S. government official close to the ongoing review. A second source, who was not authorized to speak on the record, backed up the finding.  

The determination was first reported by Fox News, hours before the State Department formally announced Friday that seven email chains, found in 22 documents, will be withheld “in full” because they, in fact, contain “Top Secret” information.

The State Department, when first contacted by Fox News about withholding such emails Friday morning, did not dispute the reporting – but did not comment in detail. After a version of this report was first published, the Obama administration confirmed to the Associated Press that the seven email chains would be withheld. The department has since confirmed those details publicly.

The decision to withhold the documents in full, and not provide even a partial release with redactions, further undercuts claims by the State Department and the Clinton campaign that none of the intelligence in the emails was classified when it hit Clinton's personal server.

Fox News is told the emails include intelligence from "special access programs," or SAP, which is considered beyond “Top Secret.”

Those Secret Service guards around her Chappaqua house that Hillary pointed to as securing her server were powerless to prevent even middle-grade hacking, much less the efforts of powers like China; Russia; or, for example, Albania or Ecuador, from reading her emails.  Such as:

Fox News reported Friday that at least one Clinton email contained information identified as "HCS-O," which is the code for intelligence from human spying. 

It is in the nature of such secrets that we probably never will learn if people died as the result of Hillary’s security lapse.  She has reverted to claiming that it was a matter of “convenience” to use the home-brew server, meaning, apparently, that she is back to claiming she wanted to carry only one device, a BlackBerry, when in fact it is known that she had at least two.

The obvious explanation is that she wanted to control who could see the content of her emails, which by law would be subject to the Freedom of Information Act if they were on the secure State Department email systems.  “Convenience” in this case could mean staying out of jail.

That may not work.