Democratic strategists worry that Hillary can't beat Trump

The current conventional wisdom is that Hillary Clinton would make mincemeat out of Donald Trump in a head-to-head matchup in the general election.  Jeb Bush thinks Clinton would "crush" Trump – an observation not reflecting current polling, which has Clinton holding a narrow lead over The Donald.

But with polls all over the map and Trump continuing to confound the experts by leading the GOP field by a mile, some Democratic Party strategists are becoming increasingly worried that Trump's bombastic, insulting style of campaigning would make Hillary Clinton an easy target in the general election.

Washington Times:

“I hear a lot of people saying, ‘You know, I’ve watched the Democratic debates and the Republican debates, and they’re so different. I’m sure glad I’m on the Democratic side and they’re talking about the issues. They don’t always agree with one another, but they explain why,’” said David Allen, a Democratic Party leader in Barnstead, New Hampshire. “Democrats have resolved themselves to not go into a circus and tear one another down.”

But Mr. Allen said he does worry about how the eventual Democratic nominee will stand up to the sort of withering barbs Mr. Trump has dished out to his own side.

“We’re going to start to have to look at how the [Democratic] candidates play against Donald Trump, because he’s certainly holding onto his lead in the Republican Party, and he has certainly played the Republican candidates in a way that has hurt some of his opposition, and I think people are going to start asking, ‘All right, who’s going to stand up under his type of campaigning?’” Mr. Allen said. “If Bernie [Sanders] is the candidate, Trump will play up how un-American socialism is, and if Hillarygets it, he will dig up everything in the past 40 years and use it — and won’t mince words in using it.”

Other activists say there’s a sense that, while it’s Mrs. Clinton’s turn to run, there’s no swell of on-the-ground enthusiasm for her to carry theparty’s banner into the general election.

“I don’t think the [Democratic primary] race has generated all that much intensity,” said Ron Romine, chairman of the Spartanburg, South Carolina, Democrats, who is neutral in the race. “I don’t feel like anywhere in the state there’s all that much passion. The usual suspects will go out and vote, but there’s not an intensity that you might think there should be with the first woman.

Hillary is so familiar, she’s been around forever. She has her supporters, and they’re going to go out and vote for her, so there’s not a whole lot to parse out,” he said. “You either like her or you’re not enthusiastic.”

Mr. Trump already has started taking aim at Mrs. Clinton, just as some activists had feared.

Indeed, both candidates are vulnerable to attack, given the fact that they've both been in the public eye for decades.  But the problem for Hillary is that Trump is likely to attract a significant number of Democratic voters – far more than Hillary would be likely to snare Republican voters.  That and the decided lack of enthusiasm for her candidacy in voting blocs where Clinton needs maximum turnout spells big trouble.

No one is going to run away and hide in this race.  It's going to be a close one, and "conventional wisdom" notwithstanding, Trump will be able to compete with Clinton in almost every state.

The current conventional wisdom is that Hillary Clinton would make mincemeat out of Donald Trump in a head-to-head matchup in the general election.  Jeb Bush thinks Clinton would "crush" Trump – an observation not reflecting current polling, which has Clinton holding a narrow lead over The Donald.

But with polls all over the map and Trump continuing to confound the experts by leading the GOP field by a mile, some Democratic Party strategists are becoming increasingly worried that Trump's bombastic, insulting style of campaigning would make Hillary Clinton an easy target in the general election.

Washington Times:

“I hear a lot of people saying, ‘You know, I’ve watched the Democratic debates and the Republican debates, and they’re so different. I’m sure glad I’m on the Democratic side and they’re talking about the issues. They don’t always agree with one another, but they explain why,’” said David Allen, a Democratic Party leader in Barnstead, New Hampshire. “Democrats have resolved themselves to not go into a circus and tear one another down.”

But Mr. Allen said he does worry about how the eventual Democratic nominee will stand up to the sort of withering barbs Mr. Trump has dished out to his own side.

“We’re going to start to have to look at how the [Democratic] candidates play against Donald Trump, because he’s certainly holding onto his lead in the Republican Party, and he has certainly played the Republican candidates in a way that has hurt some of his opposition, and I think people are going to start asking, ‘All right, who’s going to stand up under his type of campaigning?’” Mr. Allen said. “If Bernie [Sanders] is the candidate, Trump will play up how un-American socialism is, and if Hillarygets it, he will dig up everything in the past 40 years and use it — and won’t mince words in using it.”

Other activists say there’s a sense that, while it’s Mrs. Clinton’s turn to run, there’s no swell of on-the-ground enthusiasm for her to carry theparty’s banner into the general election.

“I don’t think the [Democratic primary] race has generated all that much intensity,” said Ron Romine, chairman of the Spartanburg, South Carolina, Democrats, who is neutral in the race. “I don’t feel like anywhere in the state there’s all that much passion. The usual suspects will go out and vote, but there’s not an intensity that you might think there should be with the first woman.

Hillary is so familiar, she’s been around forever. She has her supporters, and they’re going to go out and vote for her, so there’s not a whole lot to parse out,” he said. “You either like her or you’re not enthusiastic.”

Mr. Trump already has started taking aim at Mrs. Clinton, just as some activists had feared.

Indeed, both candidates are vulnerable to attack, given the fact that they've both been in the public eye for decades.  But the problem for Hillary is that Trump is likely to attract a significant number of Democratic voters – far more than Hillary would be likely to snare Republican voters.  That and the decided lack of enthusiasm for her candidacy in voting blocs where Clinton needs maximum turnout spells big trouble.

No one is going to run away and hide in this race.  It's going to be a close one, and "conventional wisdom" notwithstanding, Trump will be able to compete with Clinton in almost every state.