Democracy minus religion?

As the Christmas season ends, I want to share with readers this short video done by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen. His book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, is the best business book published in the last half-century (sorry, Donald Trump) and has revolutionized the way we understand technological innovation, which is, after all, the driving force of our Western civilization.  Since the publication of that landmark, he has led a large-scale research project that has proved that he has in effect discovered a natural law about the way organizations handle innovation.  It is a stunning intellectual advance and makes him one of the most important thinkers of our era.

A number of years ago, Christensen suffered a stroke that robbed him of the ability to speak.  The last time I saw him, four years ago, he was well along in the process of regaining speech, a major accomplishment, as it requires re-learning everything from the ground up, the brain having lost its reserves.  As the video will demonstrate, the rehab is totally complete.

Professor Christensen was always a religious man, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  But his stroke turned his energies even more toward concern with spiritual matters, and his book, How Will You Measure Your Life?, reflects that emphasis.

The video does not concern any particular religion, but rather the question of democracy and religion.

Hat tip: iOTW Report

As the Christmas season ends, I want to share with readers this short video done by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen. His book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, is the best business book published in the last half-century (sorry, Donald Trump) and has revolutionized the way we understand technological innovation, which is, after all, the driving force of our Western civilization.  Since the publication of that landmark, he has led a large-scale research project that has proved that he has in effect discovered a natural law about the way organizations handle innovation.  It is a stunning intellectual advance and makes him one of the most important thinkers of our era.

A number of years ago, Christensen suffered a stroke that robbed him of the ability to speak.  The last time I saw him, four years ago, he was well along in the process of regaining speech, a major accomplishment, as it requires re-learning everything from the ground up, the brain having lost its reserves.  As the video will demonstrate, the rehab is totally complete.

Professor Christensen was always a religious man, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  But his stroke turned his energies even more toward concern with spiritual matters, and his book, How Will You Measure Your Life?, reflects that emphasis.

The video does not concern any particular religion, but rather the question of democracy and religion.

Hat tip: iOTW Report