Trump accused of pandering to fear and division, according to experts in fear and division

The latest campaign against Donald Trump accuses him of using fear tactics to get votes.

The NYT says:

"His entire campaign is run like a demagogue's – his language of division, his cult of personality, his manner of categorizing and maligning people with a broad brush," said Jennifer Mercieca, an expert in American political discourse at Texas A&M University.

He has a particular habit of saying "you" and "we" as he inveighs against a dangerous "them" or unnamed other – usually outsiders like illegal immigrants ("they're pouring in"), Syrian migrants ("young, strong men") and Mexicans, but also leaders of both political parties.

This pattern of elevating emotional appeals over rational ones is a rhetorical style that historians, psychologists and political scientists placed in the tradition of political figures like Goldwater, George Wallace, Joseph McCarthy, Huey Long and Pat Buchanan, who used fiery language to try to win favor with struggling or scared Americans. 

Well, they certainly managed to make that connection to racists, but I'm puzzled why they also didn't compare him to Klansman Robert Byrd, or FDR, who appointed Klansman Hugo Black to the Supreme Court, or Bill Clinton's mentor J. William Fulbright, who was a segregationist.

But the master of fear and division is Obama and the liberal media.  (I combine the two because it is hard to tell where one ends and the other begins.)

1) They accused Trump of being racist for calling Mexican immigrants rapists.  The only problem is, he never said that.  Trump was talking about some illegal aliens, not legal Mexican immigrants.  Falsely accusing Trump of racism is a classic "us vs. them" strategy, attempting to get Hispanics to hate Donald Trump.

2) They accuse Trump of wanting to create a registry of American Muslims, something he has denied (he called for a registry of refugees from Middle Eastern countries, which we already have).  Again, they accuse him of racism, this time against Muslims, to create the "us vs. them" narrative.

3) Obama accuses our police forces of being racist, fanning the hatred of black radicals against them.

4) People who want our immigration laws enforced are labeled racist against Hispanics, again trying to use fear to motivate Hispanics to vote Democrat.

5) People who oppose Muslim immigration are called "Islamophobes," even though there is a very real basis  to fear such immigration.

In short, it is Obama and the media who use fear and the "us vs. them" strategy to raise hatred against conservatives and Donald Trump for their own political purposes.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

The latest campaign against Donald Trump accuses him of using fear tactics to get votes.

The NYT says:

"His entire campaign is run like a demagogue's – his language of division, his cult of personality, his manner of categorizing and maligning people with a broad brush," said Jennifer Mercieca, an expert in American political discourse at Texas A&M University.

He has a particular habit of saying "you" and "we" as he inveighs against a dangerous "them" or unnamed other – usually outsiders like illegal immigrants ("they're pouring in"), Syrian migrants ("young, strong men") and Mexicans, but also leaders of both political parties.

This pattern of elevating emotional appeals over rational ones is a rhetorical style that historians, psychologists and political scientists placed in the tradition of political figures like Goldwater, George Wallace, Joseph McCarthy, Huey Long and Pat Buchanan, who used fiery language to try to win favor with struggling or scared Americans. 

Well, they certainly managed to make that connection to racists, but I'm puzzled why they also didn't compare him to Klansman Robert Byrd, or FDR, who appointed Klansman Hugo Black to the Supreme Court, or Bill Clinton's mentor J. William Fulbright, who was a segregationist.

But the master of fear and division is Obama and the liberal media.  (I combine the two because it is hard to tell where one ends and the other begins.)

1) They accused Trump of being racist for calling Mexican immigrants rapists.  The only problem is, he never said that.  Trump was talking about some illegal aliens, not legal Mexican immigrants.  Falsely accusing Trump of racism is a classic "us vs. them" strategy, attempting to get Hispanics to hate Donald Trump.

2) They accuse Trump of wanting to create a registry of American Muslims, something he has denied (he called for a registry of refugees from Middle Eastern countries, which we already have).  Again, they accuse him of racism, this time against Muslims, to create the "us vs. them" narrative.

3) Obama accuses our police forces of being racist, fanning the hatred of black radicals against them.

4) People who want our immigration laws enforced are labeled racist against Hispanics, again trying to use fear to motivate Hispanics to vote Democrat.

5) People who oppose Muslim immigration are called "Islamophobes," even though there is a very real basis  to fear such immigration.

In short, it is Obama and the media who use fear and the "us vs. them" strategy to raise hatred against conservatives and Donald Trump for their own political purposes.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.