Happy holidays: Harvard instructs students how to talk to their families about 'diversity'

The Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion at Harvard University has thoughtfully given first-year students some helpful tips on how to talk to their racist, bigoted relatives when they go home for Christmas.

Yes, really.

The social justice warriors have created a placemat to be used in freshmen dining halls that's divided into four parts, with talking points on subjects such as "Black Murders in the Streets" and "Islamophobia/Refugees."

Campus Reform:

To prepare for discussion of the topic of “House Master Title,” students should prepare answers to the question: “Why did they change the name? What does a housemaster have to do with slavery? It’s not related to that at all.”

When responding, the placemat suggests students say: “For some, the term master, used to describe stewardship of a group of people (such as a house), is reminiscent of slave masters and the legacy of slavery. The title, ‘House Master,’ is no longer actively associated with its historical antecedents nor is it used to address House Masters. Given the name is offensive to groups of people, it doesn’t seem onerous to change it. The mastery of a subject is an understandable use of the word. However, within our cultural and historical context, implying mastery of people feels both inappropriate and ill-founded.”

The placemat implies that they should be prepared to defend the motives of black student activists at other universities.

“Why are Black students complaining? Shouldn’t they be happy to be in college?” the placemat puts forward as a possible question.

When answering, the placemat recommends students acknowledge their privilege rather than criticize the experience of students of color.

“When I hear students expressing their experiences of racism on campus I don’t hear complaining,” the placemat suggests as a response. “Instead I hear young people uplifting a situation that I may not experience. If non-Black students get the privilege of that safe environment, I believe that same privilege should be given to all students.”

The diversity office festooned the placemat in nice, cheery Christmas colors.

Teaching students to propagandize their parents and relatives is not what these families are paying for when they sent their kids to Harvard.  But what the placemat really represents is a slavish devotion to a warped view of the world that is being drummed into the heads of kids who don't know any better.  They've already been brainwashed in high school so that these talking points seem perfectly normal, despite the twisted view of reality being offered.

These talking points do not encourage "diversity."  They legitimize a cultural assault on common sense while helping to create a victimhood narrative.  It's ludicrous to think the students will use any of this garbage when they go home.  And you would hope they know better than to spout this nonsense off campus. 

The Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion at Harvard University has thoughtfully given first-year students some helpful tips on how to talk to their racist, bigoted relatives when they go home for Christmas.

Yes, really.

The social justice warriors have created a placemat to be used in freshmen dining halls that's divided into four parts, with talking points on subjects such as "Black Murders in the Streets" and "Islamophobia/Refugees."

Campus Reform:

To prepare for discussion of the topic of “House Master Title,” students should prepare answers to the question: “Why did they change the name? What does a housemaster have to do with slavery? It’s not related to that at all.”

When responding, the placemat suggests students say: “For some, the term master, used to describe stewardship of a group of people (such as a house), is reminiscent of slave masters and the legacy of slavery. The title, ‘House Master,’ is no longer actively associated with its historical antecedents nor is it used to address House Masters. Given the name is offensive to groups of people, it doesn’t seem onerous to change it. The mastery of a subject is an understandable use of the word. However, within our cultural and historical context, implying mastery of people feels both inappropriate and ill-founded.”

The placemat implies that they should be prepared to defend the motives of black student activists at other universities.

“Why are Black students complaining? Shouldn’t they be happy to be in college?” the placemat puts forward as a possible question.

When answering, the placemat recommends students acknowledge their privilege rather than criticize the experience of students of color.

“When I hear students expressing their experiences of racism on campus I don’t hear complaining,” the placemat suggests as a response. “Instead I hear young people uplifting a situation that I may not experience. If non-Black students get the privilege of that safe environment, I believe that same privilege should be given to all students.”

The diversity office festooned the placemat in nice, cheery Christmas colors.

Teaching students to propagandize their parents and relatives is not what these families are paying for when they sent their kids to Harvard.  But what the placemat really represents is a slavish devotion to a warped view of the world that is being drummed into the heads of kids who don't know any better.  They've already been brainwashed in high school so that these talking points seem perfectly normal, despite the twisted view of reality being offered.

These talking points do not encourage "diversity."  They legitimize a cultural assault on common sense while helping to create a victimhood narrative.  It's ludicrous to think the students will use any of this garbage when they go home.  And you would hope they know better than to spout this nonsense off campus.