Did Obama administration shut down intel operation that could have averted San Bernardino attack?

Philip Haney, a former employee at the Department of Homeland Security, has revealed that his superiors shut down an investigation that might have raised a red flag and averted the recent Islamic terror attack in San Bernardino.  On Thursday, Megyn Kelly interviewed Haney, with backstory provided by Trace Gallagher.

Per Gallagher, Haney was one of the founding members of DHS.  He was later assigned to the Intelligence Review Unit, where he investigated individuals with potential links to terrorism.  While in this position he began to observe trends, including links between global terror networks and radicalized Muslims who were coming to America.

A year into the investigation, the State Department and the DHS Civil Rights Division told Haney that tracking these groups and individuals was problematic because they were Islamic groups.  Haney reports that internal memos forbade him from developing any cases based on this profile.

His investigation was shut down, and many of his records were deleted, including evidence about a suspicious group as well as specific individuals tied to the mosque in Riverside, California, that Farook attended.

Haney notified Congress and the DHS inspector general about the termination of his investigation into Islamic groups.  Instead of reinstating the investigation, he asserts they retaliated, relieving him of his duties and revoking his security clearance.  Fox News reached out to the DHS for comment.  They claimed that there are “many holes” in Haney’s story but could not comment further due to privacy laws.

During the interview with Kelly, Haney went into some detail about connections among various terror groups.  He also spoke about the thousands of individuals his unit was tracking who were traveling in and out of the United States on the visa waiver program.  As the investigation continued, more and more pieces fell into place.  Among them, and as noted, Haney identified individuals connected to Farook’s mosque who would have been flagged.  Haney did not say that Farook, in particular, was one of those people, but he appeared confident that if his investigation had been allowed to go forward, it is likely that Farook would have been identified. Once identified and flagged, Farook would have been put on the no-fly list because of his association with that mosque, and/or the K-1 visa his wife received might have been denied because of Farook’s affiliation with a known terror organization via the mosque (or perhaps directly, as well).

In sum, Haney believes that if he had been allowed to continue his investigation, he may have uncovered enough information to have thwarted the recent terror attack in San Bernardino.

Haney appears to have had a distinguished career, stating he has a commendation letter for finding 300 terrorists.

Hat tip: The Right Scoop

Philip Haney, a former employee at the Department of Homeland Security, has revealed that his superiors shut down an investigation that might have raised a red flag and averted the recent Islamic terror attack in San Bernardino.  On Thursday, Megyn Kelly interviewed Haney, with backstory provided by Trace Gallagher.

Per Gallagher, Haney was one of the founding members of DHS.  He was later assigned to the Intelligence Review Unit, where he investigated individuals with potential links to terrorism.  While in this position he began to observe trends, including links between global terror networks and radicalized Muslims who were coming to America.

A year into the investigation, the State Department and the DHS Civil Rights Division told Haney that tracking these groups and individuals was problematic because they were Islamic groups.  Haney reports that internal memos forbade him from developing any cases based on this profile.

His investigation was shut down, and many of his records were deleted, including evidence about a suspicious group as well as specific individuals tied to the mosque in Riverside, California, that Farook attended.

Haney notified Congress and the DHS inspector general about the termination of his investigation into Islamic groups.  Instead of reinstating the investigation, he asserts they retaliated, relieving him of his duties and revoking his security clearance.  Fox News reached out to the DHS for comment.  They claimed that there are “many holes” in Haney’s story but could not comment further due to privacy laws.

During the interview with Kelly, Haney went into some detail about connections among various terror groups.  He also spoke about the thousands of individuals his unit was tracking who were traveling in and out of the United States on the visa waiver program.  As the investigation continued, more and more pieces fell into place.  Among them, and as noted, Haney identified individuals connected to Farook’s mosque who would have been flagged.  Haney did not say that Farook, in particular, was one of those people, but he appeared confident that if his investigation had been allowed to go forward, it is likely that Farook would have been identified. Once identified and flagged, Farook would have been put on the no-fly list because of his association with that mosque, and/or the K-1 visa his wife received might have been denied because of Farook’s affiliation with a known terror organization via the mosque (or perhaps directly, as well).

In sum, Haney believes that if he had been allowed to continue his investigation, he may have uncovered enough information to have thwarted the recent terror attack in San Bernardino.

Haney appears to have had a distinguished career, stating he has a commendation letter for finding 300 terrorists.

Hat tip: The Right Scoop