Denver's 2015 post-marijuana legalization crime wave intensifies

As another month goes by in Colorado's marijuana legalization experiment, Denver's 2015 crime wave cranks up yet another notch.

November's crime data is out for the city, and it doesn't tell a pretty story.  There were another eight murders in Denver during November, bringing the year-to-date total to 50, which is more than 72 percent higher than last year's numbers.

Across the board, other violent crime in Denver is also skyrocketing this year.  The number of rapes has increased 16 percent, robberies are up 13 percent, and aggravated assaults are up 14 percent based on the UCR standards and up 15 percent using the NIBRS definition.

Overall violent crime has increased 14 percent.  Total crimes are up almost 4 percent.

In 2014, marijuana legalization advocates were claiming that the opposite trends would take place.  Crime should decrease, they said, because marijuana use doesn't lead to criminal behavior, and the decriminalization of the substance should reduce organized crime associated with the sale of a formerly illicit drug.

If the data so far is any indication, the Pollyannas were wrong.

As another month goes by in Colorado's marijuana legalization experiment, Denver's 2015 crime wave cranks up yet another notch.

November's crime data is out for the city, and it doesn't tell a pretty story.  There were another eight murders in Denver during November, bringing the year-to-date total to 50, which is more than 72 percent higher than last year's numbers.

Across the board, other violent crime in Denver is also skyrocketing this year.  The number of rapes has increased 16 percent, robberies are up 13 percent, and aggravated assaults are up 14 percent based on the UCR standards and up 15 percent using the NIBRS definition.

Overall violent crime has increased 14 percent.  Total crimes are up almost 4 percent.

In 2014, marijuana legalization advocates were claiming that the opposite trends would take place.  Crime should decrease, they said, because marijuana use doesn't lead to criminal behavior, and the decriminalization of the substance should reduce organized crime associated with the sale of a formerly illicit drug.

If the data so far is any indication, the Pollyannas were wrong.