CNN poll: More Americans say the terrorists are winning than ever before

A poll conducted by CNN between December 17-21, shows that 40% of Americans believe the terrorists are winning with just 18% believing the US is. Another 40% believe neither side has the advantage. 

The 40% who believe the terrorists are winning represents the highest that number has been in the poll's history.

The poll has a lot of little nuggets of information that reveal a public very concerned with the Obama administration's response to terrorism and little faith that the government can protect them from a major terrorist attack.

Interestingly, even Democrats appear to have lost faith in the President's ability to keep them safe.

While less than half of Americans say the terrorists are winning, the current 40% who do believe that is 17 points above the previous high of 23% reached in August 2005. Another 40% say neither side has an advantage, and just 18% say today that the U.S. and its allies have the upper hand -- 10 points off the previous low for that measure, reached in January 2007.

Majority dissatisfaction with the war on terrorism crosses party lines, with even a majority of Democrats, 59%, expressing unease with the case prosecuted by the Obama White House. Seventy-nine percent of independents and 86% of Republicans also say they are dissatisfied with how it has fared.

RELATED: Trump dominates GOP field heading into 2016

A majority of Republicans, 55%, say they think the terrorists are winning, while most Democrats, 52%, feel neither side has an edge.

But Americans are holding out hope that something can be done: For the first time, a majority of Americans say government can prevent all major attacks if it works hard enough at it (few, however, see that happening). Just 45% say that "terrorists will always find a way to launch major attacks no matter what the U.S. government does," down from about 6 in 10 who said so in most previous polling on this question.

Fifty-three percent of Americans polled say the U.S. can absolutely repel attacks, with more likely than Democrats to express this confidence (58% of Republicans say all attacks can be prevented vs. 46% of Democrats). In a survey conducted around the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, majorities across party lines said terrorists would always find a way: 55% of Democrats, 62% of independents and 55% of Republicans.

Yet worries that a terrorist attack could hit home are at their highest level since 2005. Only about half express confidence that the Obama administration can protect U.S. citizens from future acts of terrorism. Overall, 45% say they are very or somewhat worried that they or someone in their family will become a victim of terrorism.

As a political issue, terrorism is hot right now. But what about during the primary season or next November? Public perception of the Obama administration's competency in handling the terror threat has dropped through the floor, and Obama's credibility on the issue has also tanked. It's apparent that people simply don't feel that there is a recognition in Washington of the kind of enemy we face and the threat they pose.

That's a damning indictment of the president and his party who are largely following his lead.

A poll conducted by CNN between December 17-21, shows that 40% of Americans believe the terrorists are winning with just 18% believing the US is. Another 40% believe neither side has the advantage. 

The 40% who believe the terrorists are winning represents the highest that number has been in the poll's history.

The poll has a lot of little nuggets of information that reveal a public very concerned with the Obama administration's response to terrorism and little faith that the government can protect them from a major terrorist attack.

Interestingly, even Democrats appear to have lost faith in the President's ability to keep them safe.

While less than half of Americans say the terrorists are winning, the current 40% who do believe that is 17 points above the previous high of 23% reached in August 2005. Another 40% say neither side has an advantage, and just 18% say today that the U.S. and its allies have the upper hand -- 10 points off the previous low for that measure, reached in January 2007.

Majority dissatisfaction with the war on terrorism crosses party lines, with even a majority of Democrats, 59%, expressing unease with the case prosecuted by the Obama White House. Seventy-nine percent of independents and 86% of Republicans also say they are dissatisfied with how it has fared.

RELATED: Trump dominates GOP field heading into 2016

A majority of Republicans, 55%, say they think the terrorists are winning, while most Democrats, 52%, feel neither side has an edge.

But Americans are holding out hope that something can be done: For the first time, a majority of Americans say government can prevent all major attacks if it works hard enough at it (few, however, see that happening). Just 45% say that "terrorists will always find a way to launch major attacks no matter what the U.S. government does," down from about 6 in 10 who said so in most previous polling on this question.

Fifty-three percent of Americans polled say the U.S. can absolutely repel attacks, with more likely than Democrats to express this confidence (58% of Republicans say all attacks can be prevented vs. 46% of Democrats). In a survey conducted around the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, majorities across party lines said terrorists would always find a way: 55% of Democrats, 62% of independents and 55% of Republicans.

Yet worries that a terrorist attack could hit home are at their highest level since 2005. Only about half express confidence that the Obama administration can protect U.S. citizens from future acts of terrorism. Overall, 45% say they are very or somewhat worried that they or someone in their family will become a victim of terrorism.

As a political issue, terrorism is hot right now. But what about during the primary season or next November? Public perception of the Obama administration's competency in handling the terror threat has dropped through the floor, and Obama's credibility on the issue has also tanked. It's apparent that people simply don't feel that there is a recognition in Washington of the kind of enemy we face and the threat they pose.

That's a damning indictment of the president and his party who are largely following his lead.