Five Great Christmas Carols

Not to be obsessed with donkeys (see above), but in trying to choose a favorite Christmas carol, I discovered there’s one called Donkey Carol! (Who knew?!) It’s a lively song with the sweetest words that is the perfect complement to my blog about donkeys in the Holy Land. Give a listen.

Donkey Carol

By John Rutter and performed by The Cambridge Singers with The City of London Sinfonia

Not content to share just one carol (and not even a classic one, at that) I’m linking to a few more gems. The next one is a wonderfully spirited medieval carol.

Gaudete

Originally published in a collection of Finnish/Swedish sacred songs in 1582 and performed by Liberia

Switching gears, the next song is a beautifully spare performance of a classic carol.

I Wonder as I Wander

By John Jacob Niles and performed by Maureen Hegarty

I have a soft spot for carols that are slow and contemplative. So here are two more that fall into that category.

In the Bleak Midwinter

Based on a poem by Christina Rossetti and performed by Susan Boyle with Liberia

Let all Mortal Flesh

A Medieval folk song sometimes sung as a Christmas carol. Derived from “Prayer of the Cherubic Hymn” from the litany of St. James and written in the 4th century. Performed by Fernando Ortega

Not to be obsessed with donkeys (see above), but in trying to choose a favorite Christmas carol, I discovered there’s one called Donkey Carol! (Who knew?!) It’s a lively song with the sweetest words that is the perfect complement to my blog about donkeys in the Holy Land. Give a listen.

Donkey Carol

By John Rutter and performed by The Cambridge Singers with The City of London Sinfonia

Not content to share just one carol (and not even a classic one, at that) I’m linking to a few more gems. The next one is a wonderfully spirited medieval carol.

Gaudete

Originally published in a collection of Finnish/Swedish sacred songs in 1582 and performed by Liberia

Switching gears, the next song is a beautifully spare performance of a classic carol.

I Wonder as I Wander

By John Jacob Niles and performed by Maureen Hegarty

I have a soft spot for carols that are slow and contemplative. So here are two more that fall into that category.

In the Bleak Midwinter

Based on a poem by Christina Rossetti and performed by Susan Boyle with Liberia

Let all Mortal Flesh

A Medieval folk song sometimes sung as a Christmas carol. Derived from “Prayer of the Cherubic Hymn” from the litany of St. James and written in the 4th century. Performed by Fernando Ortega