A tale of two Bills: Cosby and Clinton

The story of Bill Cosby’s arraignment yesterday on charges of rape got headline treatment across the nation and signals very bad news for the candidacy of Hillary Clinton.  Legal experts say the case against Cosby is weak, unless the testimony of some of the 52 women who have complained of sexual predation by Cosby can be admitted as testimony, establishing a pattern of behavior, or modus operandi, as the lawyers like to say.

The legal proceedings against Cosby are certain to be a major topic of discussion in the months ahead.  Much of that discussion will center on the proposition that if so many women are making similar complaints, that adds believability.  And the question then becomes: “Why weren’t they believed or even listened to before?”

In Cosby’s case, the answer has to do with the lovable image he projected and the powerful financial interests in keeping him in the public’s fond regard.

The very same analysis applies directly to Bill Clinton.  The list of women believed to have been his sexual prey may not run to 52, but it includes:

Paula Jones

Monica Lewinsky (his subordinate)

Elizabeth Ward Gracen

Gennifer Flowers

Kathleen Willey

Juanita Broaddrick

Dolly Kyle Browning

And who knows how many underage girls on Orgy Island.

Update: A more complete [yet undoubtedly still only partial] list is found here.

Making certain these women were not believed was Hillary Clinton’s job, and she did a capable job of it.

If legal matters move forward quickly, we could see another “trial of the century” raising the issue of a powerful man with a friendly image accused of taking advantage sexually of a string of women and then shutting them up with money and threats.

With then name and initial Bill C.

It can’t help Hillary.

The story of Bill Cosby’s arraignment yesterday on charges of rape got headline treatment across the nation and signals very bad news for the candidacy of Hillary Clinton.  Legal experts say the case against Cosby is weak, unless the testimony of some of the 52 women who have complained of sexual predation by Cosby can be admitted as testimony, establishing a pattern of behavior, or modus operandi, as the lawyers like to say.

The legal proceedings against Cosby are certain to be a major topic of discussion in the months ahead.  Much of that discussion will center on the proposition that if so many women are making similar complaints, that adds believability.  And the question then becomes: “Why weren’t they believed or even listened to before?”

In Cosby’s case, the answer has to do with the lovable image he projected and the powerful financial interests in keeping him in the public’s fond regard.

The very same analysis applies directly to Bill Clinton.  The list of women believed to have been his sexual prey may not run to 52, but it includes:

Paula Jones

Monica Lewinsky (his subordinate)

Elizabeth Ward Gracen

Gennifer Flowers

Kathleen Willey

Juanita Broaddrick

Dolly Kyle Browning

And who knows how many underage girls on Orgy Island.

Update: A more complete [yet undoubtedly still only partial] list is found here.

Making certain these women were not believed was Hillary Clinton’s job, and she did a capable job of it.

If legal matters move forward quickly, we could see another “trial of the century” raising the issue of a powerful man with a friendly image accused of taking advantage sexually of a string of women and then shutting them up with money and threats.

With then name and initial Bill C.

It can’t help Hillary.