What did Ben Carson really say about euthanasia?

The internet has been alive with the sound of pro-lifers upset about Ben Carson's supposed statement condemning attempts to save Terri Schiavo from being murdered by her husband.

First, note that the source is the Washington Post, which hates blacks like Carson who don't toe the white liberal line.  Note that just last week, the liberal hive created a bogus attack on Carson's honesty, so it's clear that liberals are making sure to punish him for not being sufficiently subservient to liberals.\

Second, here's what the Post said Carson said:

We face those kinds of issues all the time and while I don't believe in euthanasia, you have to recognize that people that are in that condition do have a series of medical problems that occur that will take them out[.] ... Your job [as a doctor] is to keep them comfortable throughout that process and not to treat everything that comes up.

Reading this, it becomes obvious that Carson is not endorsing killing an otherwise healthy Schiavo by dehydration.  Rather, he appears to be confused about the facts of the case and seems to think that Schiavo died due to complications from her condition.

We see the same when he says that "people that are in that condition do have a series of medical problems that occur that will take them out[.]"

Schiavo died not from a medical problem, but from deliberate killing.  But if Carson thought she died from natural complications, then he'd be right in saying that Congress getting involved would have been an overreaction.  The reaction was justified in this case, because Schiavo was murdered.

While we need to get clarification from Carson on this issue, the quote produced by the Washington Post does not support the belief that Carson, who specifically says he doesn't support euthanasia – the deliberate killing of the sick – was endorsing the death by dehydration of Terri Schiavo.

The Catholic Church, the gold standard when it comes to strict end-of-life morality, says that it is not necessary to provide all forms of medical care that could prolong a person's life.  However, nothing can be done to deliberately kill the patient, such as removing water or food.

In the quote above, Carson is essentially presenting the Catholic position.  That in turn implies that Carson is not in fact familiar with the Schiavo situation.

Whether or not you like Ben Carson as a presidential candidate, we need not to rush to judgment based on a MSM hit piece.

If Carson specifically says he's okay with the deliberate killing of Terri, which would contradict his rejection of euthanasia, then pro-lifers will have to question if he's a good candidate.  At the moment, however, the only "crime" Carson appears to have committed is commenting on an issue where he lacks accurate facts.

You can read more of Tom's rants at his blog, Conversations about the obvious, and feel free to follow him on Twitter.

The internet has been alive with the sound of pro-lifers upset about Ben Carson's supposed statement condemning attempts to save Terri Schiavo from being murdered by her husband.

First, note that the source is the Washington Post, which hates blacks like Carson who don't toe the white liberal line.  Note that just last week, the liberal hive created a bogus attack on Carson's honesty, so it's clear that liberals are making sure to punish him for not being sufficiently subservient to liberals.\

Second, here's what the Post said Carson said:

We face those kinds of issues all the time and while I don't believe in euthanasia, you have to recognize that people that are in that condition do have a series of medical problems that occur that will take them out[.] ... Your job [as a doctor] is to keep them comfortable throughout that process and not to treat everything that comes up.

Reading this, it becomes obvious that Carson is not endorsing killing an otherwise healthy Schiavo by dehydration.  Rather, he appears to be confused about the facts of the case and seems to think that Schiavo died due to complications from her condition.

We see the same when he says that "people that are in that condition do have a series of medical problems that occur that will take them out[.]"

Schiavo died not from a medical problem, but from deliberate killing.  But if Carson thought she died from natural complications, then he'd be right in saying that Congress getting involved would have been an overreaction.  The reaction was justified in this case, because Schiavo was murdered.

While we need to get clarification from Carson on this issue, the quote produced by the Washington Post does not support the belief that Carson, who specifically says he doesn't support euthanasia – the deliberate killing of the sick – was endorsing the death by dehydration of Terri Schiavo.

The Catholic Church, the gold standard when it comes to strict end-of-life morality, says that it is not necessary to provide all forms of medical care that could prolong a person's life.  However, nothing can be done to deliberately kill the patient, such as removing water or food.

In the quote above, Carson is essentially presenting the Catholic position.  That in turn implies that Carson is not in fact familiar with the Schiavo situation.

Whether or not you like Ben Carson as a presidential candidate, we need not to rush to judgment based on a MSM hit piece.

If Carson specifically says he's okay with the deliberate killing of Terri, which would contradict his rejection of euthanasia, then pro-lifers will have to question if he's a good candidate.  At the moment, however, the only "crime" Carson appears to have committed is commenting on an issue where he lacks accurate facts.

You can read more of Tom's rants at his blog, Conversations about the obvious, and feel free to follow him on Twitter.