Star Wars creates female soccer ball droid as role model for young girls

Let's face it: there has always been a lack of female role models in Star Wars, at least when it comes to droids.  R2-D2 is as male as you can get.  C-3PO is obviously transgendered (perhaps he learned to speak like a girl at a taxpayer-funded institution).  So, we must ask, where are the female droids?

Disney has finally come up with the answer.

B B-8, the orange-and-white droid from JJ Abrams's forthcoming Star Wars: The Force Awakens, beeped, rolled and zoomed its way into our hearts after the release of the very first trailer for the film. But one thing we didn't know, was that BB-8 was female.

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy later referred to BB-8 as "she", and reports from the films set, as well as some of the Star Wars publicity materials, suggested that the new droid was a girl

"There's never been a strong female robot in any Star Wars film," the source said.  JJ [Abrams] was determined to make BB-8 cute and strong – and female.  

While the question of robots and gender could probably fill a dozen ethics papers – is it determined by the maker? The robot themselves?  Do droids really need a gender, and if so should they be restricted to just two?

This makes perfect sense.  For years, young girls watched the Star Wars films but had no female droid role models to look up to.  Girls who want to grow up to become droids had no droids to model themselves after.  Girls also can't relate to men in the film, because girls can't relate to any story that doesn't have a female protagonist, according to feminists.  So now they have a soccer droid all their own.

I hope BB-8 is strong and powerful and aggressive.  We don't want our female ball droids to show any weakness.  That would reflect badly on women.

I wonder if BB-8 is being introduced as a love interest to R2-D2?  R2 has all sorts of attachments, and BB-8 has all kinds of slots.  Is it possible they could work together to fabricate another droid, one that could be built inside BB-8's ball frame once R2-D2 had "provided her with the plans" to do so?

It's a good thing that we have a female droid now.  And that that the main protagonist of the film, Daisy Ridley, is a female.  And that the all-male Storm Trooper force is commanded by a female, Gwendolin Christie.

I'm glad Disney is keeping its eyes on important things when molesting these classic films.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.

Let's face it: there has always been a lack of female role models in Star Wars, at least when it comes to droids.  R2-D2 is as male as you can get.  C-3PO is obviously transgendered (perhaps he learned to speak like a girl at a taxpayer-funded institution).  So, we must ask, where are the female droids?

Disney has finally come up with the answer.

B B-8, the orange-and-white droid from JJ Abrams's forthcoming Star Wars: The Force Awakens, beeped, rolled and zoomed its way into our hearts after the release of the very first trailer for the film. But one thing we didn't know, was that BB-8 was female.

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy later referred to BB-8 as "she", and reports from the films set, as well as some of the Star Wars publicity materials, suggested that the new droid was a girl

"There's never been a strong female robot in any Star Wars film," the source said.  JJ [Abrams] was determined to make BB-8 cute and strong – and female.  

While the question of robots and gender could probably fill a dozen ethics papers – is it determined by the maker? The robot themselves?  Do droids really need a gender, and if so should they be restricted to just two?

This makes perfect sense.  For years, young girls watched the Star Wars films but had no female droid role models to look up to.  Girls who want to grow up to become droids had no droids to model themselves after.  Girls also can't relate to men in the film, because girls can't relate to any story that doesn't have a female protagonist, according to feminists.  So now they have a soccer droid all their own.

I hope BB-8 is strong and powerful and aggressive.  We don't want our female ball droids to show any weakness.  That would reflect badly on women.

I wonder if BB-8 is being introduced as a love interest to R2-D2?  R2 has all sorts of attachments, and BB-8 has all kinds of slots.  Is it possible they could work together to fabricate another droid, one that could be built inside BB-8's ball frame once R2-D2 had "provided her with the plans" to do so?

It's a good thing that we have a female droid now.  And that that the main protagonist of the film, Daisy Ridley, is a female.  And that the all-male Storm Trooper force is commanded by a female, Gwendolin Christie.

I'm glad Disney is keeping its eyes on important things when molesting these classic films.

This article was written by Ed Straker, senior writer of NewsMachete.com, the conservative news site.